Tag Archives: Professional Pet Sitters

Orphaned grey squirrel

Wildlife, help for injured or orphaned

WILDLIFE INFORMATION

First and foremost be CAREFUL.  Rabies is a problem in New Hampshire.  It is also illegal to possess wild animals in the state of New Hampshire.  However, if you need information here are some websites.  Click on highlighted/underlined text to go to the website.

What do you do first if you find a wild animal?  (click here to learn what to do first)

If the animal is injured Bedford Animal Hospital and Merrimack Animal Hospital have wildlife rehabilitators working there and can help the injured animal immediately.  CALL FIRST, do not just show up at the hospital.

What do you do if you find a baby…….(click below for information on specific animals)

If you are looking for wild life rehabilitators in New Hampshire, be aware that all are required to be licensed by the NH Fish & Game.  However, it is all volunteers.  These volunteers use their own time,  money and vehicles to care for all wildlife.  So be patient for return calls.  Since there are few volunteers to cover the entire state of New Hampshire, these rehabbers become filled to capacity VERY fast.

Click here for a list of NH Wild Life Rehabilitators .

Dori (owner of Prof. Pet Sitting Etc.) was a licensed wildlife rehabilitator for NH for over 20 years.

If you can dedicate time and space to helping the babies, please do.  It is very rewarding and much needed.

Wildlife rehabilitators are needed in New Hampshire

 

Fudge, Siberian Husky 1

Meet Some of the Dogs We have Helped

Meet Some of the Dogs We have Helped

Here is a sampling of the many rescues that Dori has been involved with.  Dori’s passion is animal welfare and has been helping animals in need all her life.

 

Fudge 

Siberian Husky, 1-2-90 – 10-14-05

Fudge came into my life on December 13, 1991. He was bought as puppy for a Valentine’s Day present. Being a Siberian husky, his previous owners believed he should be an ‘outside dog’ and, at just 8 weeks of age, tied him to a tree in the yard. For the next year and a half, every day and night, the dog was left alone outside. When he would bark or whine for attention he was either yelled at or beaten. Disgusted with the continued abuse, concerned neighbors called a friend of mine who was also a husky breeder.

Upon witnessing Fudge’s situation, she told the owners she was taking him and they did not argue. The owners gave her his pedigree papers and all (his father was classified as a grand Champion in the show ring for purebred Siberian Huskies).  I think they were actually happy to not have to deal with him anymore.  While trying to free the dog she was bitten, as all human contact in his life so far had been painful, he was naturally defensive. She brought him home.   I took him on, put him through basic and advanced obedience training and he slowly turned around.  He was extremely food aggressive and was an alpha personality, which made him a hard case to train.  He finally accepted me as the alpha in his life and I was able to use him in demonstrations, expos and other events (many of you probably met him).  He was used in many advertisements (on my brochure, on this web site, newspapers).
Fudge passed away at almost 16 years old. We had some tough times but, as he learned what love was, he responded with leaps and bounds and had become an unending source of joy in our lives.

Siberian Huskies are one of the most beautiful breeds but also the most highly intelligent and stubborn.  This breed is NOT for everyone and I would not recommend this breed as a first dog.  It is highly advised to do ALOT of research on this breed.  Talk to many owners, breeders and rescue leagues of the Siberians.  Get as much perspective BEFORE obtaining any pet but especially a Siberian.  They will ALWAYS be my favorite breed (Fudge was my third Siberian).  Many Siberians are given up because they were left as outside dogs and became bored.  This breed needs alot of interaction as a family member, obedience training and does quite well, when this happens.  If they are left alone alot, they are very good at becoming escape artists from fenced in areas (either jumping or climbing fences or digging under) or if tied, they will chew or break most ropes or chains.  They LOVE to run and have been known to end up miles from home in a short time, that is what makes them good sled dogs!  They are also, unfortunately great hunters.  They are almost as good, in some cases maybe better then cats, at killing mice and other rodents.  Most Siberians do not bark at things they are hunting, they stalk quietly until they are right behind.  If they are left to roam freely, they may find fun in killing other small animals.  It is NEVER good to let any pet roam, but especially not a good idea to let a Siberian roam freely.  Most Siberians do shed quite literally, year round.  Shedding winter and summer coats, they have a double coat for insulation in both winter and summer.  They should be brushed as often as you can.  Even with all that, in my opinion, Siberians are the most amazing dogs, with baby blue eyes and soft cuddly coats.  The Siberians, I have come to love have the personalities of little people.  Their intelligence makes them great obedience candidates, but their intelligence also makes them stubborn enough to decide NOT to do something.  You need to make it fun and interesting for them.  Many Siberians do have Alpha personalities, so it is best to not let them get away with too much. they do best with consistency and boundaries with some fun mixed in.

If you are thinking of a Siberian as your next pet, feel free to contact me, find a Siberian Owner or Breeder, or research the breed.  They are a breed that is not for every one.

 

Coming Soon

Meet

Armouk – Siberian Husky

Prince – Samoyed

Schultz – German Shepard

Tyler – German Shepard

Jappaloup- Greyhound

Blue – Greyhound

Oliver – Greyhound

Barney – Greyhound

 

 

 

Spanky 2

Meet Some of the Cats We Have Helped

Meet Some of the Cats We Have Helped

Scroll down to see our recent fosters

Here is a sampling of the many rescues that Dori has been involved with.  Dori’s passion is animal welfare and has been helping animals in need all her life.

 

Ricky, Lulu and Spanky

April, 2002

In April 2002, I was made aware of approximately 32 cats and kittens inside a building and informed that they may have had no food and water for a few days. I called our pet sitter in that area who also happened to be the Animal Control Officer. We both went to check it out and were saddened by what we found. This little house had no heat – in April it was still very cold – and there was no running water or food. Feces and urine were everywhere throughout the entire home (which was later condemned and destroyed).

When the cats saw us, they all piled up at the front door, where the Animal Control Officer kept them occupied. I entered through the side door which allowed me to get inside without any cats escaping. As soon as they saw me, they swarmed and I had to tear open the 25 pound bag of cat food. They just climbed right into the bag, scrambling over one another because they were so hungry.

We had brought bags of litter and large cardboard boxes to provide clean bathrooms, and were able to obtain several jugs of water from a neighbor.

The cats were friendly and seemed healthy. Unfortunately none of them were neutered, so it is assumed they had interbred. The range of ages were 5 weeks to approximately 5+ years. I made some phone calls and many people jumped to assist us: the Merrimack Valley Feline Rescue donated distemper vaccines, feline leukemia/FIV combo tests and worming medication. The Feline Friends Rescue volunteered help, and a few of my Veterinary Technician friends volunteered their time. We gave them physicals, vaccines, tests (all negative, thankfully), and wormed them. The Animal Rescue League in Bedford, NH was gracious enough to take all the of cats and adopt them.

I chose to take a 6 month old white with black named Spanky. He was petrified of people and literally climbed the walls to get away.  I knew he would not do well in the shelter.  I balanced him out with an overly-friendly black with a bit of white littermate, named Lulu. I have found that animals take cues from one another, and I knew that Spanky would be looking at Lulu for comfort and learning in new situations.

I also adopted a 5 week old kitten named Ricky, who was diagnosed with congenital cataracts and was expected to be blind by the time he was a year old, may possibly have distemper, etc. He also had a mysterious black yeasty substance all over his face, eyes and in his ears.  I had taken him to 4 different veterinarians, who were not familiar with whatever he had.  After 4 years, I finally found, Dr. Holub who does help with Tufts Animal Hospital.  He explained that Ricky (who did not have distemper, nor cataracts and was not blind), had allergies.  Allergies in animals do not manifest like they do in humans, with itchy watery eyes, congestion and sneezing.  In animals, allergies usually manifest in skin conditions.  In Ricky’s case, his allergies manifested in an over production of black yeast in the hair follicles, known as Malazizia Pachydermitits.  With the help of Dr. Anne Johnson, we did a blood allergy test.  Poor Ricky is allergic to numerous grasses, tree pollen, black ants, 2 types of dust mites and a slew of other things.  He now gets an allergy injection every 14 – 21 days and a monthly bath to keep the yeast at bay.  I love all my cats, but Ricky is so completely special.  He and I have this amazing connection, he is my “Soul Kitty”.

All three kitties (Lulu, Spanky and Ricky) acclimated into my home as if they had never been anywhere else and are doing fine with my other 7 cats!   Lulu is still loveable and Mr. Spanky is an insatiable cuddle bug!  I am so lucky to have them in my life.

Ricky
Ricky

 

 

Spanky
Spanky
Lulu
Lulu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raina

7-12-06

Raina was apparently thrown from a car in the southbound high speed lane, just before exit 4 on the Everett Turnpike in Nashua.

I came across an unbelievable scenario driving down Everett Turnpike just before Exit 4. A young 8 month old female cat was clinging as close to the middle barrier as she possible could, in the pouring rain. I could not believe my eyes so I got off at Exit 4, and got back on to come around and sure enough, it was a cat. I pulled over into the break down lane and soon there after a Nashua Police Officer pulled up behind me. Thinking there was hope, I was glad to see him.

He came up to talk, I told him the situation, he saw the cat and demanded that I leave.  He stated the cat got there and she will leave on her own. I left infuriated, my daughter was with me and I instructed her to call everyone we knew in rescue (and we know a lot). I turned around and went back, figuring the officer was going to have to arrest me, because I was not going to leave that area until I knew she was safe. Soon, three rescuers came armed with capture equipment. I called Maureen of the Bedford Shelter and she called the NH State Police.

The State Police Officer came down and he met up with the same Nashua Police Officer who made me leave.  The amazing State Officer made him (Nashua Police Officer) stop all lanes on the highway, so we could rescue her, now named Raina.

After examination, we found that all 4 paws were raw, she was pretty scraped up and emaciated. The evidence pointed to the probability that she was thrown from a moving vehicle. It took months but she recovered and is happy in her forever home.

 

More to Come Soon !!

Danny

Raji

Pooh

Sazar & Desilu

Felice & Linus

 

We are a Foster Family for

Manchester Animal Shelter

AND Humane Society Of Greater Nashua

All Fosters found homes

2014

Litter of 5 Kittens, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Litter of 5 Kittens, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Litter of 5 Kittens, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Litter of 5 Kittens, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Litter of 5 Kittens, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Litter of 5 Kittens, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Litter of 5 Kittens, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Litter of 5 Kittens, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Litter of 5 Kittens, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Litter of 5 Kittens, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015

20 15

Ann, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Ann, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Andy, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Andy, Manchester Animal Shelter, May 2015
Buster and Bobby, Manchester Animal Shelter, June 2015
Buster and Bobby, Manchester Animal Shelter, June 2015

 

Brooklyn And Chelsea, Manchester Animal Shelter, July 2015
Brooklyn And Chelsea, Manchester Animal Shelter, July 2015

 

Merlin, dog with ice pack on head

Help for Sick Pets

Help for Sick Pets

Spay & Neuter Clinics & More in NH

For our Complete list of NH organizations as well as National organizations, Check out our article –

Help, My Pet is Sick,  and I have No Money!!

 The worst feeling is when you love your pet more than words can say and they become ill.  To make matters worse, there is medical help but it will cost more than you can afford.  I have been in the situation more than once but luckily, I did have resources and credit cards to take care of the high cost of helping my pets.  My heart goes out to those that are less fortunate than I.  The guilt of not being able to take care of one’s pet is a horrible experience.  I hope that anyone reading this has never been in that situation.  I wrote this to help if you are or if you know someone who is in need of help.

Heartbreaking Situation – a pet owner is unable to afford treatment and their sick or injured companion animal pays the price. If the owner is homeless, a veteran, elderly, disabled or on a fixed income, the cost of care may be too much. Perhaps they have been victimized by crime, property loss or a job layoff and are experiencing a temporary financial hardship or trauma in their life, making it too difficult to afford pet care. And some animals, brought to clinics by kind hearted people, don’t have an owner to pay for treatment. Whatever the situation, the fact remains the same: When sick or injured animals are unable to receive veterinary care, they suffer.

Here is a list of organizations that are set up to help.If you know of an organization not on this list, please contact me via email at Profpetsit@aol.com 

Keep in mind, that these organizations may require certain things from you.  They may need to know why you need help, may require financial proof, etc.  Please do not take this personally, they just want to help those in need and want to be able to stretch their funds the farthest.  Each organization is independent and has their own set of rules and guidelines. Therefore you will have to investigate each one separately to determine if you qualify for assistance:

DONATIONS to any of these organizations will help them continue their great work and help many more animals.

ORGANIZATIONS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE

  • Your Veterinarian – check with your veterinarian.  Some Animal Hospitals have funds that have been donated for such a purpose. If your veterinarian has a fund, please let us know.

Shelters in NH

Organizations in NH

  • Helping People, Helping Pets
    • Helping People, Helping Pets is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that provides access to veterinary care, pet medications, and pet food assistance to loving pet owners who are experiencing financial difficulty and are at risk of losing their pets.
    • Serving the counties of Hillsborough, Merrimack, Rockingham and Strafford
  • All Better Pets – Manchester, NH
    • All Better Pets was established in 2010,  with a mission to provide care for abandoned and homeless pets (however,They helped a dog Molly in 2013 who got hit by a plow and broke all 4 limbs. The owner brought her to the clinic, so you may need to ask for this assistance) .  In 2012, All Better Pets officially became a 501(c)3 non-profit.  To date, All Better Pets has ‘mended’ and placed over 200 animals through its facility and helped hundreds of animals working through other organizations.

Spay & Neuter Programs in NH

Great Fun Video on Importance of Spay/Neuter – Click here to watch !!

  • Animal Rescue Veterinary Services – Londonderry, NH
    • Low cost spay and neuter clinics for owned dogs and cats under 6 years of age.
  • Merrimack River Valley Feline Rescue
    • The Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society’s Catmobile Program is a subsidized mobile spay/neuter clinic designed specifically for cats. Our package includes a brief exam, spay/neuter, rabies vaccination for cats over 12 weeks of age (weighing 1.5kg/3.3 lbs.), flea treatment and nail trim.
  • Manchester Animal Shelter: Manchester
    • Low cost Spay/neuter clinic For owned cats and rabbits
    • Free Spay/neuter for PitBulls & Pit Mixes
  • Rozzie May Animal Alliance, Conway,
    • Mobile Spay/Neuter Van
    • Vaccine and Microchip Clinic
    • Pet Food Pantry
  • State of NH Plan B Spay and Neuter Assistance
    • State of NH has Plan B program:
      • if you receive or are eligible to receive financial assistance from the state of NH (food stamps, SSI etc) you can get your pet fixed for $30 through Plan B
      • Please ask organizations and your veterinarian if they accept this.
Juliet, puppy playing in snow

Disaster Planning for Pets & Families


Disaster Planning

for You, Your Pets & Family

      written and compiled by Dorinne Whynott,

 

In the past decade, it has been scary with all the hurricanes, tsunamis, floods, fires and earthquakes.   These are big enough reasons to warrant an evacuation, but there are smaller reasons, too.  You could have a house fire or if you live near a train track or a highway, there could be an accident with one of the vehicles carrying hazardous material, there could be work done on a home near you and someone accidentally hits a gas line.  We all live within a few hundred miles from a nuclear plant or there is the possibility of a biological and/or terrorist attack.  In Nashua, a few years ago, some were evacuated from their homes when there was a chemical problem in a plant in the southern part of the city.  Spring of 2006 brought drought and dry conditions, starting wildfires to many NH towns and then there was the Mother’s Day floods.

If you ever need to be evacuated, DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND.  If it is unsafe for you, it is unsafe for them. Even if you are told you will be back in a few hours, take your pets.  Once you are evacuated, you will NOT be allowed back into the affected areas and there is always the possibility of the disaster becoming worse.   Survival of you, your family and pets goes up dramatically if you are prepared, so here are some tips and information collected from The American Humane Association, Humane Society of the United States, Emergency Animal Rescue Service, The ASPCA,  and The American Red Cross.  If you would like further information please contact these organizations, (contact information located at the end of this document).

Disasters can happen at anytime and anywhere.  In a disaster, roads may be out, cell towers may be down, phone lines and electricity may be stopped so do not depend on these.  Cells phones are always a good idea, however, it is also advisable to have a corded phone, so in the case of no electricity and no cell phone, you will still have a phone line in case of emergency.  When a disaster strikes, you may not have much time to respond so please be proactive.  Prepare BEFORE a disaster.  Hopefully, you will never have to experience a disaster, but the probability is that you will at some point in your life, being prepared will help in a very hard stressful situation.  As we saw in New Orleans, it is best to not rely on state or federal government for all your needs.

Think about what you would do if you had to live in your home during a disaster.  What would you do for food? Water? What if you had no electricity? No heat?  What if there were no gas available? No propane? No Oil? What would you do if the outside air was contaminated? How would you seal your home?  What if you had to stay in your home for 4 – 6 weeks?  Okay, this sounds drastic,  but what if?  When the planes hit the towers, what did you think?  I thought we were at war.  What if the scenario of the TV series “Jericho” were a reality?  One day you are living your life as you have always done, and then within minutes life as you know it changes.  All I am suggesting, is to think about these things, prepare for as much or as little as you feel comfortable to protect you, your family and your pets.  I am giving you suggestions that can apply if you are contained in your home and/or if you are evacuated from your home.  Of course, if you can stay in your home, you can prepare with more food, water, etc, then if you must leave and pack things in your vehicle.  You will need to decide before hand, what would you bring and not bring if you must leave.  So, here are some ideas.

Create a Family Disaster Plan

  • Contact your local emergency management or civil defense office and your local American Red Cross Chapter.  Find out which disasters are most likely to happen in your community.  Ask how you would be warned.  Find out how to prepare for each. Ask the American Red Cross for a brochure on “Your Family Disaster Supplies Kit”. Click on Making a Disaster Kit for more information.

·     Meet with your family.  Discuss the types of disasters that could occur.  Explain how to prepare and respond.  Discuss what to do if you need to evacuate.  Practice what you have discussed.

  • Plan how your family will stay in contact if separated.  Pick two meeting places: 1. a location a safe distance from your home in case of fire  2. a place outside your neighborhood in case you can not return home.  Also, choose an out-of-state friend as a “check-in contact” for everyone to call if a disaster you.
  • Complete the following: Post emergency numbers by every phone and put these numbers in wallets and pocketbooks to go with you.  Show responsible family members how and when to shut off water, gas and electricity main switches.  If you ever go away post this information in a visible place. Make a map of your house as to where these are.
  • Keep gas tanks in vehicles full at all times, Stock pantries of canned goods (One month’s supply is best), keep cash on hand, keep plastic gloves and masks (boxes marked N95 or N100, can be purchased at drug stores and also used around home when using chemicals, painting, etc.) for disease control and if air is contaminated.  If a disaster hits, gas, food, and other necessary items will be in short supply and banks will be closed.
  • Post Pet Rescue Stickers on each door.  They must be easily visible to rescue workers and must contain the types and number of pets inside, the name of your veterinarian and phone number, your phone numbers (cell, work, emergency) and emergency person’s phone numbers. Professional Pet Sitting Etc. does have Pet Rescue window clings for sale.
  • Install fire/smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors on each level of your home, especially near bedrooms, test monthly and change the batteries two times each year (an easy way to remember is to change batteries when the clocks are changed in spring and fall).  It is also recommended to replace these devices every FIVE years.  Another recommendation is to buy devices that communicate with each other, so if the one in the basement goes off, the others sound also and say the room of the unit that is sending the alarm.
  • Contact your local fire department to learn about fire hazards.  Have your home inspected for fire hazards and repair, also have your fire extinguishers checked.  If you can afford to equip your home with a fire sprinkler system, these systems can extinguish a fire within minutes and keep damage to a minimum.
  • Learn first aid and CPR (for people and pets), you can contact your local American Red Cross for information and training. Click here for Pet First Aid Video.
  • Meet with your neighbors.  Plan how the neighborhood could work together after a disaster.  Know your neighbors’ skills (medical, technical). Consider how you could help your neighbors who have special needs, such as elderly, disabled persons and neighborhood pets.  Make plans for child care AND pet care in case you can not get home.
  • Always bring pets indoors at the first sign or warning of a storm or disaster.  Pets can become stressed, disoriented and wander away from home during a crisis.

 

REMEMBER TO PRACTICE AND MAINTAIN YOUR PLANS.

The federal government has passed the PETS ACT, basically stating that each state must include pets in there disaster response plans.  The following is a compilation of pet disaster preparedness from the American Humane Association, Humane Society of the United States, Emergency Animal Rescue Service, and the American SPCA:

 Where could you go?

  • Know where you can go with your family and your pets BEFORE anything happens.  Evacuation shelters will not allow animals, so it is up to you to know where to go.
  • Call hotels in and out of state.  Go to the book store, there are books that list pet friendly hotels. Ask hotels with a “no pet policy” if that would be waived in the event of an emergency (A great source is the web site Pets Welcome).
  • Keep a list of pet friendly places and their phone numbers.
  • As soon as you hear that there may be an evacuation, call and make reservations and go as soon as possible.  These hotels will book fast. Most operate on a first come, first served basis.  Be one of the first to arrive and give your pets plenty of time to settle.
  • If your pet is not used to traveling, take them for short rides in the car now, it will help them in a time of crisis and when they are going to regular check up.
  • If they are not used to being crated/caged, again now is the time to get them used to it by feeding them in their crate/cage and leave the doors open, gradually get them used to staying in their crates for periods of time.  If pets are not used to leashes, collars, harnesses (especially cats), it is advisable to accustom your pet to these also.  If you have a pet that does not have some basic obedience training, or your pet is not used to strangers, etc., work on these now.  Not only will it be a better life for you and your pets working with them to being comfortable in these situations in case of a disaster, but everyone will be able to live better at home if there were no disaster also.  Again, helping your pets now, will help you and them later.
  • Contact your veterinarian or pet professional for a list of emergency animal shelters.  Click here to view many shelters in NH.
  • Check with your local animal welfare shelter to determine if they provide emergency shelter or foster care for pets. Animal shelters may be over burdened caring for the animals they already have, as well as those displaced by disaster, so this should be your last resort.
  • Ask friends and relatives outside your immediate area if they would be willing to take in you and your pets in a disaster.  If you have more than one pet, they may be more comfortable if kept together, but be prepared to house them separately.
  • Choose a Designated Caregiver.  This is best when you take considerable time and thought.  You should make plans for a temporary home for your pets in the event of an emergency (and you may need to make arrangements for a permanent home in the event you can no longer care for your pet, if you become incapacitated or worse).
  • If you have not prepared a will and a trust, now is the time to do this.  If you already have a will and a trust and your pets are not included, this may also be the time that you consider adding your pets to your wills and trusts if something should happen to you.  Unlike a will, a trust provides for your  pet immediately, and can apply not only if you die but if you become disabled (call your wills & trust lawyer for more information). 
  • Professional Pet Sitting Etc. and Dori have been placed in quite a few trusts by their clients to be notified in case of an owner’s passing to care for pets until they go to the prearranged home in the trust, or they have entrusted the company to find a permanent home.

 

Make a Disaster Emergency Kit

  • Make an emergency kit (make a kit for you,  a kit for your cat  and a kit for your dogs) and put everything in a plastic container, ready to go at a moments notice.  You can use water proof luggage, duffel bags, Rubbermaid storage containers, trash cans, etc.  Remember that no one can predict mother nature, you may be evacuated much longer than you originally thought, so pack for an extended stay.  If you do not need everything you bring, great, save it for the next time.
  • Make a list of items (not in your emergency kit like photos, your grandmother’s ring, etc.) you want to take or itemize what you may need to do for the emergency and post it on the inside of your bedroom door.  Purchase an inexpensive lockbox or a small fire proof safe to place these important items in.  If you need to leave you can bring this with you. Making your list ahead and having these important items in an easily accessible place will ensure that you won’t be scrambling when disaster happens. It is best to prepare this list when you are calm and over a period of time with much thought.  You will not be able to think of everything in a crisis. Practice time (how long it takes you to do everything from packing the car to actually driving away), in many cases you are only given 15 minutes to 24 hours to evacuate.
  • Now is the time to check what you have for insurance on your home and belongings.  Make sure that you have guaranteed replacement” if your home and belongings are completely destroyed.  Also ask about inflation in rebuilding, etc.  It is advisable to take pictures of your home inside and out.  Take pictures of each room, include all your belongings and if possible, write down an inventory.
  • Scan all photos (personal and for insurance) and place on a CD, put family videos on DVD, make a list of all bank numbers, credit card numbers, include institutions phone numbers, all important documents (home mortgage, insurance – life, house, health, passports, etc.
  • For all important documents, photos, CDs, DVDs, etc. if you can make three copies of each, and place one copy with a trusted friend or family member, second copy in a bank security box with the third (or originals ) with you.  This way if anything ever happened you will have access to this important information (and memories), one way or another if one or two are unavailable.
  • If you ever need to be evacuated due to unsafe conditions – anything can happen.  Everything could be fine and you can return to your everything could go very wrong and everything in a 5 mile radius could be completely destroyed.  So when you plan, plan for the worst.  When you evacuate, you will not be able to bring everything you have stored for a disaster.  It is just not feasible to bring everything, so you need to decide when you are calm and not in a disastrous situation (in a trauma situation, we may not make wise thought out choices) what is important to bring and what you must leave behind.

 

 Food

  • It is recommended by all sources to have a supply of food and water for pets and people and medications if needed.  One month’s supply is best.
  •  Canned food stores best but rotate cans using the oldest and replacing with new. Buy flip top cans or keep a manual can opener (in case of no electricity).
  • Keep dry pet food in airtight containers (never leave dry pet food in bags on concrete, as concrete depletes nutrients and moisture through the bag).  Also, check these plastic containers to make sure they are “food quality” containers. Many plastics leach chemicals into food products that are not good for consumption.
  •  Have extra bowls (disposable bowls or paper plates do not have to be cleaned between uses, so you do not use up much needed water).
  •  Make sure that you have spoons for mixing food, disposable is good.
  •  Buy a small grill with a supply of charcoal to cook with, in case you lose electricity.  Gas grills are great, however, keep an extra full propane tank.  Also keep in mind if you could not obtain more gas/propane.

 

 Water

  • It is recommended  2 gallons per person per day, 1 gallon per pet per day, One month’s supply is best.  This is a lot of water, so at the first sign of disaster fill empty containers and tubs.
  • If tap water is unsuitable for human consumption then it is unsuitable for animal consumption.
  • Store drinking water in tightly sealed plastic containers.
  • Do not store water in direct sunlight (will grow algae).  Rotate water every 2-6 months.
  • Have extra water and bowls/bottles on hand for pets.

 

 Housing

  • The best situation is for you and your family to be in your home together, self contained.  Check into alternative energies – solar, wind.  There are many solar products to produce energy to run household items.  Some items to have on hand – solar and/or battery powered lights, emergency TV/radio to keep up to date on information, CB radios may come in handy also.
  •  If you must leave your home, the best situation is for your family and pets to stay together.  If your pets can not stay where your family is staying, spend as much time with them as possible.  This will keep them calm and prevent others from bothering your pets.  KEEP IN MIND – pets have been stolen in a crisis situation.
  • Purchase wire collapsible cages to house cats and small dogs (and other small pets).  Make sure it is large enough to put a litterbox, food, water and a small area for the pet to sleep (this will help if you need to keep the pets contained).
  •  Each carrier should be labeled with pets inside, owner information & numbers, general care and vaccine history.  Keep copies of medical records in safe dry container with pets, a copy with you and a third copy in a safe place.
  •  To help keep a pet calm, bring a blanket to cover the cage.
  •  Also, bring a lock to lock the cage door so that the door can not accidentally come open by accident or by curious people if you are in a shelter (a combination lock is best, keys can become lost or misplaced).
  •  Bring a harness and leash for exercising pets out side of the cage.
  •  Bring extra collars, harnesses, and leashes and a portable tie out if needed (never leave your pet unsupervised when out of carriers).
  •  Bring pet beds and toys if they are easily transportable and there is room, especially if they can help keep your pet happy and calm.
  •  Make sure pets have access to water – obtain a good quality water bottle made for carriers (bowls can be tipped over and create a mess).
  •  Try to keep to some schedule for feeding and exercising.
  •  Be aware of temperatures where your pets are housed – it should not be too hot or too cold.

 

 Cleaning Supplies

  • If you are evacuated bring a small container of dish soap and disinfectant (Purelle).
  •  Bring a minimum of FOUR rolls of paper towels (more if space allows), small bags to dispose of waste, Litter scoops, pooper scoopers, litterboxes (bring extra disposable litterboxes , aluminum roasting pans work great).
  •  Bring enough litter, One month’s supply is best (try to use less than you normally would).

 

 First Aid

  • Have a human first aid kit (Pre-made kits& MORE )and a first aid kit & book for your animals.  Pre-assembled animal & human first aid kits can be purchased or go to one of the organizations at the end of this article and ask for a list of items to make your own –
  •  During or after a disaster and in high stress, a pet’s behavior can temporarily change, packing a muzzle  is a good idea in case behavior becomes less than desirable, plus your pet may be in close quarters with other pets and may be cared for by people they do not know (especially if something happens to you).
  • If your pet is stressed and does not travel well or hates unfamiliar surroundings, talk with your veterinarian about possibilities of medications to keep on hand in an emergency.

 

Medications

  • Have any long term medications, for you or your pets. One month’s supply is best.
  •  If you have any medical conditions that others should be aware of, wear a medical alert bracelet so that people will know if you can not speak for any reason.
  •  If your animal is on a long term medication or has a medical condition (allergies, diabetic, kidney failure, FIP, etc.), have a tag made indicating this and put it on your animal’s collar (same idea as an alert bracelet for people).
  •  Also check out the Health section below for more information

 

 Identification

  •  Have a collar and ID tag for any animal that can wear them (remember to include the above medical conditions).
  •  Use safe break away collars for cats.  All cats (and dogs) should have collars and ID and be used to wearing them all of the time.
  •  On the collar and/or tag include your name, home phone number, an alternate phone number and your address.
  •  Another permanent form of ID, which can be used in addition to a collar and tag is micro chipping, in case collars and tags fall off. Check with Animal Shelters or your Veterinarian.
  •  Attach a temporary tag with the phone number and address of your temporary shelter (if you know it), or of a friend or relative outside buy temporary tags that you can write on and set them aside in your disaster kit.  Another good idea when you are traveling or visiting with your pet, attach this temporary tag with the temporary vacation information, just in case your pet gets loose.

 

 Photos

  • Have multiple copies of current (within 6 months) photos of your animals to help locate them should they get lost.
  •  Include yourself in some photos as proof of ownership.
  •  As stated above, take photos of your house and belongings inside and out for insurance.  Put all photos (personal and insurance) on CDs.  Put all taped memories on DVDs.  Make three copies of everything, one copy to a trusted friend or family member, one copy in a bank security box and the third copy with you.  That way, no matter what happens, you will never lose your memories and have necessary proof for insurance to start your life again if everything becomes destroyed.

 

 Health

  • Make a medical sheet for each member of the family, include things such as blood type, surgeries, dates and type of vaccinations (include all childhood & adult vaccines received), any known allergies, all medications being taken, any surgeries and/or medical conditions, list last few readings for blood pressure, etc.  This will help medical personnel if you needed medical care in the event of a disaster, if you could not speak and access to your medical history was not available.  This information is required to be carried on each person who does disaster response.  It may come in handy for each person to have, just in case.
  •  Check with your doctor about any vaccinations that may need to be updated.  Some childhood vaccinations that you have received as a child, may need to be boostered as an adult. Adult Vaccine Schedule
  •  Do a similar medical sheet for each pet
  •  Keep your pets’ vaccinations current.  This will protect them if they need to be housed with other animals.  Keep a notebook with all medical records ready to go.  You may need to show proof of vaccinations.
  •  It is advisable to keep all important paperwork in water proof containers (Ziploc bags or plastic container).
  •  In the event you are unavailable for pet care for whatever reason – It is also advisable to leave information on pets’ crate for feeding schedules, behavior problems, and a written permission slip for the pet caregiver to obtain medical for your pet in the event of a medical emergency (you may need to include a credit card number and expiration date with your signature just in case the emergency veterinarian will not treat if there is not a financially responsible party – this can be tricky because you do not want your CC information in the wrong hands).
  •  Bring grooming items, grooming helps calm some pets and will help pets that easily mat.

 

 What happens if you are not home at the time of a disaster?

  • You should choose someone who lives within walking distance to your home to check on and care for your pets.  They may also need to transport your pets to safety.
  • They should have a key to your home (or access 24/7)and know where carriers are and your disaster/emergency care box is, so they can grab and go.  Key lockboxes attach to your home, open with a code (can be changed as often as you wish) and are a great way to have emergency access to your home with a phone call to whoever you feel comfortable without having many keys out and about. (Key lockboxes are sold by Prof. Pet Sitting Etc.)
  • If you have a pet sitter or another company caring for your pet, do not rely on them.  A good pet care company will have asked you for a person you trust close by to care for your pets in the event of an emergency.  A pet care company may not live close to your home and they may need to evacuate themselves along with many other clients’ pets.  It is always best to have a back up person within walking distance to your home.  This person must be within walking distance because if your neighborhood is evacuated, no one from outside the area will be allowed in the evacuated neighborhood.
  • Have your person meet you in a  prearranged location to obtain your pets if they needed to be evacuated when you were not home.

 

What about pets other than cats or dogs?

  • Most of the suggestions above are pertaining to dogs and cats.  Horses, livestock, small pets, reptiles, birds, etc. all have special needs.  Be prepared for their care.  Also, remember that all pets will react very differently under stress.  Outside your home and in your car, ALWAYS keep dogs securely leashed and transport all cats in carriers.  Do not leave pets unattended anywhere.  Even the most trustworthy pets may panic, hide, try to escape, or even bite and scratch.  Being prepared can save your life and the life of your pets.
  • Hooved animals can be identified by taking a permanent marker to the hooves.  Write your phone number, so when found you can be notified.
  • Take off all halters, leads, blankets.  In a weather disaster, these things can get caught or entangled, possibly injuring your animals.  In a fire disaster, they can catch fire or melt into the animals’ skin.
  • Leave gates and doors open to give them the best chance, depending on the disaster.  However, take care, because your animals running loose can also pose a problem.  Whenever, possible, it is best to transport them to safety outside of the disaster area before evacuation is imminent.

 

What about other emergencies such as a Pandemic like the Bird (Avian) Flu?

  • According to Dr. Michael Osterholm as seen on the Oprah Show airing 1-24-06 (contact Harpo or go to Oprah.com for more information), it is not a question of if a pandemic of some sort will happen it is when.  He states:
  • You should have enough food, water, medications and all essentials for you and your pets to stay in your homes, (not leaving for any reason) for up to 5 WEEKS.
  • If you need to leave your home while the virus is in the air, purchase special masks with air filters to screen out Avian Flu germs.
  • Purchase plastic and duct tape to cover windows, doors and vents.  Ahead of time, cut to fit each opening and store.  This is to seal your home, to prevent the air born virus from coming into your home.
  • During and pandemic, wash hands at every opportunity.
  • You may consider getting vaccinated for pneumonia (Pneumovax).  Most people who die from the Avian flu, died with pneumonia.  The vaccine would be given to you now and then you are revaccinated at age 65 (check with your doctor).
  • It is also advised to become vaccinated every year with the flu vaccine.  Some experts believe that the Avian Flu will mutate to a humane form when a human that already has the flu also becomes infected with the Avian flu simultaneously.

 

So to recap:

At the first hint of disaster, act to protect you, your family and your pet.

  • Leave early -don’t wait for a mandatory evacuation order.  An unnecessary trip is far better than waiting too long to leave safely with your pets.
  • Call ahead to confirm emergency shelter arrangements.
  • Check to be sure your pet disaster supplies (including food, water, medications and other essentials) are ready at a moment’s notice.
  • Bring all pets into the house so that you won’t have to search for them if you need to leave in a hurry.
  • Make sure that all pets have collars, ID and medical information, and temporary tag with temporary information.

For more information on Disaster Planning click on or contact:

Dorinne Whynott has been in animal welfare since 1978, is the owner of Professional Pet Sitting Etc., the founder of the Animal Care and Education Center of New Hampshire, the Animal Angels Network, the NH Pet Sitters’ Association and a co-founder of the NH Pet Expo.

Ms. Whynott is certified for Animal Disaster Response by the American Humane Association, Humane Society of the United States and FEMA.  She is also the head of the response team in Hillsborough County for the NH Animal Disaster Response Team (NHDART).

 If you are interested in becoming part of the NH Animal Disaster Response Team (NHDART), go to the website or contact our office at 603-888-8088, we will give you information on where to go and what you need to do.

Tex, grey kitty on chair

Pet Information

Misc. Pet Care Information

 

Check out our Blog Articles for more information

FREE ANIMAL POISON CONTROL NUMBERS:

Kansas State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital     1-785-532-5679
FREE 24 hours poison control hot line for pet owners and veterinarians. Be patient. The person answering the phone may have to take a few minutes to consult the vet on duty. …

Tuft University School of Veterinary Medicine 508-839-5395

 

ADOPT, ADOPT, ADOPT.

 

Please go to an Animal Shelter or Rescue League and adopt.  There are millions of animal euthanized EVERY year, simply because there are not enough homes.  So, please neuter your pets and adopt.  Please go to our Resource section (click on to go there), to find a complete list of all animal welfare organizations in the new Hampshire area.

 

Great Animal Resource – 

is the website ASPCA Virtual Pet Behaviorist a division of the ASPCA.  Just click on anything from cat to horses.

 

Leaving your pet in the car –

Many pet owners love to bring their pets with them on a car ride, whether they are going to the store or traveling.  However, when the weather is wonderful and the temperature starts to go up, it can be VERY DANGEROUS for your pets.  If the temperature is around 70 degrees, even leaving your car windows open about 2 inches, will increase your car’s temperature to over 100 degrees in a VERY short time.  Since our pets cool their body temperature mainly by panting, when the air temperature they are breathing in is very high, they are unable to cool.  Their internal body temperature increases and if they can not cool down, your pets will slowly die.  My rule is if, the outside temperature is over 60 degrees, do not leave your pets in a car.

To learn more go to

 

How long can I safely leave canned food out, un-refrigerated?

Many people feed canned food to their pets.  I am asked all the time how long can canned food be safely left out, un-refrigerated?  According to canned food manufacturers, canned food should never be left out for more than 2 hours.  Canned food is a meat product.  After that, just like human grade steak or chicken, it will start forming harmful bacteria that could possibly make our pets sick.

Read our article – Is Your Canned Food Safe

 

Feeding free choice or just feeding morning and night? 

Many clients call and ask how should they feed their pets.  What is better?  Feeding free choice means to leave the dry food out all the time or feeding the correct amount at a specific time such as breakfast and dinner time.  Most veterinarians prefer that pets are fed the correct amount for their weight morning and night. Each pet should be fed in their own bowl (glass bowls are preferred over plastic, plastic becomes pitted after a while and harbors more bacteria.   Bowls should be cleaned after each feeding).  Pets should be prevented from eating another pets’ food.  You may need to separate each pet in a different room. This will prevent one pet from eating too fast before the other pet comes or hurrying up his food so he can eat the other’s food too.  In many cases, eating too fast can cause stomach upset and the pet who does not get to eat his entire meal is left out.  Behavioral problems may also occur over food.  Each pet should be able to eat their entire meal at their own pace.

Feeding pets alone and at certain times, also helps the pet owner to monitor a pets food intake.  If a pet is coming down with a health problem, in many cases the first sign may be that they will slow or stop eating.  If a pet does not eat his full meal every time, it may not be a cause for alarm, however, it may be a cause to call your veterinarian if he has not eaten at all in 2 days (unless you see other signs, then call immediately).  However, it is never wrong to call and ask your veterinarian if you have concerns before 2 days.

Getting your pet used to eating at certain times also has the advantage that the pet will be hungry.  Not having food around 24/7 allows the pets digestive system to have a rest, rather than allowing the pet to nibble and graze at anytime during the day or night.  Allowing access to food at all times also encourages pets to boredom eat (which brings on weight issues) or become territorial over food dishes, keeping others away.  In most cases, free choice of food allows pet owners to not notice any problems until the problems are established.

Free choice feeding also creates a problem if one pet needs to go on a diet for specific health problems, while to other does not.  The free choice feeding owner must choose to put both on the medical diet or put none on the medical diet.  Both choices are not the best.

So, what is an owner to do?  The hardest part is for all pet owners to get into a habit.  Believe me, I am the worst to change my habits.  However, once it is done, it is great.  If you have rooms to separate pets in for feeding am and pm, that is one choice, however, I have 10 cats, and finding ten different rooms in my small home to feed them in is not feasible.  So, all my cats are fed in their crates.  I have stacked 3 on the bottom, 3 in the middle and 3 on top with the tenth one on the very top.  At feeding time, all the cats run straight into their CORRECT crate.  Each crate is labeled with the cat’s name and description (in case I need someone else to feed).  The food is appropriately measured out for each cat, 3 cats are on special food and 2 cats require smaller portions (they gain weight very easily).  I have found that feeding the cats in the crates has added benefits.  Each cat is locked in the crate for however long it takes for them to eat (about 30 minutes).  It enables each cat to eat at their own speed, no more wolfing down the food before another pushes in, no bullying going on.  It also helped the two cats that were absolutely terrified of their crates feel comfortable.  Now they jump in on their own happily.  One did not like the door closed (maybe a bit claustrophobic?).  All are doing well.  I can monitor how much each cat eats at every feeding.  They are all contained in one room.  If there ever was a fire or I needed to evacuate, I am able to get all cats in their respective crates in a short period of time and place out the window….For me, this way of feeding works quickly, is great for healthy feeding, helps with pets who hate their crates and if ever you needed to evacuate in an emergency.  This is a good thing.

 

What are some winter care tips for my pet?

  • Keep indoor pets in a dry, warm area free of drafts. If possible, elevate your pet’s bed off the floor.
  • Provide dogs and cats with a dry, insulated pet house or shelter out of the wind. Bring your pet inside if the temperature or wind chill goes below 32° (pets feel the cold as well as we do, no matter how thick their coat is) or with nasty weather.
  • Staying warm requires extra calories, so feed your pet accordingly when the temperature drops. Talk to your veterinarian for advice on feeding your pet.
  • Cats and kittens often nap on car engines for warmth. Knock on the hood and honk the horn; then wait a few minutes before starting your car. (Cats and kittens are always safer as indoor pets)
  • Pets like the smell and taste of antifreeze, but even a very small amount can kill them. Thoroughly clean up spills at once. Tightly close containers and store them where pets cannot get them.
  • Always have fresh, clean water available for your pet. Check water every 2 hours for freezing or get an electric heated water bowl. Fresh, clean unfrozen water is essential.
  • Remove ice, salt, and caked mud from your pet’s paws and coat at once. Contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has frostbite. Frostbitten skin may turn reddish, white or gray, and it may be scaly or sloughing.
  • Alcoholic beverages, holiday treats such as chocolates, and bones from poultry, pork and fish can be harmful or toxic to your pets. Keep your pet on his regular diet.
  • Many plants – including Christmas rose, holly, mistletoe, philodendron and dieffenbachia – are toxic to pets. Keep them out of your pet’s reach.
  • Holiday paraphernalia can be dangerous to pets. Cover or tack down electrical cords. Keep tinsel and glass ornaments out of your pet’s reach. Read warnings on items like spray-on snow. Never put ribbons around your pet’s neck or allow it to play with plastic or foil wrappings or six-pack beverage holders.

Source: The Ralston Purina Company (click on to view their website).

 

Pet Web Library(click on to view website)

This website is a wealth of information on animal diseases to medical information to toxic items, diabetes and so much more.

 

Diseases that can be transferred from animal to human

Some germs are passed form animals to human.  Learn what germs can be passed from your pet to you and how you can prevent it.  Learn about Toxoplasmosis, how to protect yourself while pregnant and that cats are only a small probability for contamination, you are more likely to get it from raw meat or gardening.

Very interesting sites, click on to view –

 

Veterinarian approved homemade pet foods

This website helps you the owner, in making good nutritional well balanced pet food.  Follow the recipe very carefully to help ensure that your pet receives all the nutrition their body requires.  Click here to view the Balance IT website.

 

Neutering Your Pet

All pets, male or female should be neutered.  Not only is it necessary to help in pet overpopulation, with millions of homeless pets but it helps pets medically, psychologically and in most cases behaviorally.  For every puppy or kitten that you bring into this world and find a home for, that is one LESS home for a homeless pet in a shelter.  There are simply NOT enough homes.

 

See our article, scroll down for a list of Spay/Neuter Clinics –

 

 

Check out how old your dog or cat is.

Antech Diagnostics has a nice chart to figure out how old your dog or cat is.    This site also has some other helpful information on Senior care, etc.  Click here to go to How Old is my Pet?

 

Pets and Cancer

Cornell University has a narrated live action video designed to give pet owners a complete overview of cancer.  Click here to go to Dogs and Cancer – ASPCA.

 

Animal Hoarding – What is it & more

Tufts University answers questions about Animal Hoarding, what it is and is not, health issues, animal welfare, intervention and other resources.  We start you off at the general overview, then just click on the different sections on the navigation bar at the top.  If you know of a possible animal hoarding situation, please call our office and we will refer you to the proper help.  Click here to go to About Hoarding.

 

Do You have Allergies to Your Pet?

Many animals are brought to shelters because someone in the home is allergic.  There are a few things that you can do to help alleviate allergic symptoms and possibly keep your pet.  Click here to learn more about Allergies to Your Pets

 

Pet Loss for you and your pets

The loss of a pet can be the most devastating thing.  I have been through the loss too many times, but did you know that our surviving pets also grieve. When we lost our cat a few years ago, many of our surviving cats went through a grieving process.  Here are a few websites that may help you and your pets – A Grieving Pet , Coping with the loss of a Pet ,

 

Intestinal Worms in Dogs and Cats

Our pets can pick up many intestinal parasites.  Check out these websites to learn more.

 

Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease is becoming a bigger problem in New Hampshire, so check all pets every day after they come into your home.  Click here for more information: A Lyme Disease Primer ,

 

Humane Certified Food For Humans

The American Humane Association does many things in the world of animal welfare.  They make sure that any animals in many of the movies we watch are treated humanely and are not harmed (look for the American Humane Association statement at the end of the credits or go to American Humane Home Page).  This organization also protects children from abuse, check Protecting Children to learn more.  Now they are protecting farm animals.  If you would like to buy only humanely treated food, check  American Humane Certified Producers to learn what to look for on your food labels.

 

Products that do not harm animals

PETA has a list of many companies with their web sites, that do NO harm to animals, such as any testing on animals.  It is a pretty extensive list.  Click here to read more, and scroll down a few pages to get to the links for the websites.

 

 

Black lab in field

Dog Information

DOG INFORMATION

 

  • Canine Heartworm Disease

The American Heartworm Society website has great information and animation on Heartworm disease,  Click here for Canine Heartworm Video.

 

  • Giving your dog Medications

Giving your dog medications can be tricky.  Some dogs are very good at taking medications then they walk away and you find the pill on the floor.  Click here for some help on Giving your dog Medications Video .

 

  • Trimming your dog’s Nails

Many dogs do not like their feet touched, which makes trimming nails a chore.  When your dog is relaxed, gently massage their feet, maybe just a few seconds at first, then increase the time as your dog accepts the attention.  If he/she pulls feet away, that is okay, just try in a little while.  Always praise your dog while gently touching their feet and massaging in between toes.  Sometimes they only associate touching their feet with nail clipping.  Make this a pleasurable time.  Click here to learn more on Nail Trimming Video .

 

  • Dog Behavior

Click on the Behavior you wish to view – 

 

Training – 

 

  • Vaccinations and diseases

Here is some information on different diseases that can affect your dog and what vaccinations maybe necessary.

Click on to view –

 

  • Greyhound Information

The most mis-diagnosed disease in Greyhounds is hypothyroidism.  Greyhounds have a normal low thyroid.  Many Greyhounds are placed on Thyroid medication and in some cases it may not be necessary.  Click on www.animalmedicalcentreofmedina.com for more information.  There is a lot of great information on Greyhound Health.   Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine also has some great greyhound information, click on Greyhounds to view their website.

 

  • Siberian Husky

The Siberian Husky is Dori’s (the owner) favorite.  They are beautiful, powerful and extremely intelligent, but they are an often misunderstood breed.  Many people believe that huskies need to be an outside dog and then leave them outside enabling them to become bored, escape artists who roam for miles in a very short time getting into a lot of trouble, which tends to get them shipped to a shelter.  If you are considering sharing your home with a Siberian Husky, learn as much about this breed (as you should about ANY breed) before you bring one home.  Learn all the good as well as the bad, talk to past and present owners of Siberians, talk to rescues, talk to breeders.  The Siberian is truly a wonderful family dog, if you know what you are getting into and are willing to do some serious training.  This is not recommended for a first dog owner.  For more information, click on Siberian Husky Rescue Site for info on the breed and for rescues in your area.

Unfortunately, there is no licensed Siberian Husky Rescue in New Hampshire.

Check out our Facebook page, search for NH Siberian Husky Lovers

 

Felice, tonkinese kitty in garden

Cat Information

CAT INFORMATION

 

This is a great article from MSNBC: “Putty in their paws, why we do what cats want”.  Click to go to the article.

 

Do cats get heartworm disease like dogs?

For decades, in the Northeast, and where ever mosquitoes live, heartworm disease has been a plague for our dogs.  Until recently, it was thought that heartworm disease did not adversely effect cats.  New studies show that heartworm infection can harm our cats.  Click here for Video & information on Feline Heartworm Click on Feline Heartworm Animation and then the arrow to start video.

 

Has your cat been diagnosed with chronic kidney failure?

The Feline CRF Information Center is a great resource in up to date information on this frightening, confusing and overwhelming diagnosis of our beloved feline.  Click here to go to the Feline CRF Information Center.  and Instructions on Giving Sub-Q Fluids

 

Hyperthyroidism in Felines

Has your cat been diagnosed with Hyperthyroidism?  For more information,

Click links below for more info –

  • Radiocat in Massachusetts 
  • In NH you can go to CAVES in Concord – learn more i131 NH

 

Litterbox Information

Everything you always wanted to know about litter boxes from your cat’s point of view, and so much more.  This website delves into a comprehensive look into all kinds of problems, do’s and don’ts and so much more.  Click on Litter Box for this great website.

Check out our Gus Bennett series –

 

Feline Nutrition, Exercise, Obesity, etc.

The same website as the Litterbox above, has some great information on Feline Nutrition, Diabetes, Pilling and much more.

Click below for more information –

Check out our article – Feeding Cats by Gus Bennett

 

Diabetes in your feline

The best thing you can do is prevent the disease before it happens, learn how, Preventing Diabetes in your cat.

If you do get the diagnosis that your cat is diabetic, know everything you can on this disease.  In most cases, cats do very well if diagnosed early and regulated.  Here are two more websites on Feline Diabetes – Your Diabetic Cat and Cats and Carbs.

Click links below for more information – watch all videos Before doing anything.  Each video give info the other does not.

 

Allergies in Cats

Dori’s cat, Ricky suffers from a multitude of allergies, poor guy.  He is allergic to many environmental sources such as two types of dust mites, Maple, Yellow Dock, Sycamore, Black Ants and much more.  He is treated with an allergy injection every 10 – 21 days depending on how bad his allergies are.  Most allergies in animals come out as skin conditions (whereas in humans, we suffer most respiratory and itchy eyes).  Ricky’s allergies manifest in a skin condition of an over abundance of black yeast production all over his body (not a pretty sight).  He is bathed every 3 – 4 weeks depending on his condition.  Other problems that may occur from allergies could be open lesions, excessive grooming, hair loss, and hair thinning.  If you notice anything different, check with your veterinarian.

To learn more about allergies in your cat, click on

 

Cat Channel

This website has some great information on Cat Breeds, health, nutrition, behavior, etc.  It is a web site put out by Cat Fancy and does sell advertising, so some products advertised maybe a paid endorsement, but over all it is a good site for some information.  Click on Catchannel.com to view.

 

Declawing:  Good or Bad

Declawing your cat, is it good or bad?  Most animal welfare organizations do not condone declawing.  It is an unnecessary surgery.  Find out everything there is to know about declawing before you make the final decision.  Feel free to call our office if you would like alternatives.

Check out these websites for more information:

 

Find out more about purebred cats

The Cat Fanciers’Association (CFA) has  great information and pictures of purebred cats.  Of course, we advocate adopting homeless pets first, but if you like a certain breed of cat, you sometimes will find them in shelters if you are patient.  If you absolutely can not wait, check out these breeds.  This website also has information on upcoming sponsored cat shows, etc.

Click here for CFA recognized purebred cats.

 

Brushing Your cats Teeth

Brushing Your cats teeth can be tricky.

Click here for

 

Giving Your Cat a Pill

Click here to view Instructional Video on Giving Your Cat a Pill.

Video 2 – Cat Pilling

 

Giving your Cat Liquid Medication

Click here to view  Instructional Video on Giving Your Cat liquid medication.

Video 2 – Giving Liquid Medication

 

Taking your Cat’s Temperature

Click here to view  Instructional Video on Taking your Cat’s Temperature

 

Trimming your Cat’s Claws (nails)

Click here to view Instructional Video on Trimming your Cat’s Claws (nails)

 

Cats, Babies and Toxoplasmosis

Congratulations you are pregnant, then your doctor says get rid of your cat to protect your baby.  What do you do?  Educate yourself…..You are more likely to get Toxoplasmosis from handling raw meat or gardening in your yard than from your inside cat.  But here are some websites to help educate you and possibly your doctor.

Click the links below for more information –

 

Cat Behavior

Click on the Behavior you wish to view-

 

Indoor vs. Outdoor

Dori owns ten cats that are all considered indoor cats.  However, a special cat fence was installed on top of the existing chain link fence about 6 years ago.  All cats have been enjoying the protection of an indoor cat with the enjoyment of running and playing outside SAFELY.  Statistically, cats who are indoor cats can leave three times longer than outside cats.  Some inside healthy cats can live 18 – 20 years with outside cats averaging 6 years.  Yes, there are cats who go out and live to be 10, 15, maybe even 20 years, however, they are very lucky.  The outside cat must endure many hazards that threaten his life every day, such as dogs, cruel neighbors who do not want animals in their yard, cars, other territorial cats and many wild animals who may look at your cat as dinner!!  Just as there are leash laws to protect dogs, people and property, there should be the same for cats.  They need protection too.  If you would like to learn more, read our article – 2 ways to keep your cats safe outside

 

Vaccinations and diseases

Here is some information on different diseases that can affect your cat and what vaccinations maybe necessary.

Click on to view –

 

Caring for your cat’s emotional health

Cats are very emotional.  These wonderful little animals are very capable of expressing anger, happiness, love, separation, depression, etc.  Click here to learn more about Cat’s Emotional Health.

 

Gus Bennett 4, orange and white kitty

Our Awards, Certificates and Credentials

Our Awards, Certificates and Credentials

 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. – why choose a lesser company

If you are going to trust a pet sitting company with your pets and your home, you should know about the company.  You should know who the owner is and their background.

Below are some basics on our company, sitters and the owner. Also check out our other pages –

If you can not find this information on another companies website, choose one that does.

  • In business since 1990
  • Thorough Background Security Checks
  • Training on all employees
  • GPS on all pet sitters
  • requires all employees to sign a non-disclosure non-compete for your confidentiality and safety
  • Online Registration & Reservation Program that can be accessed anywhere via the web, 24/7

 

Plus we are:

  • One of the largest pet sitting companies in New England
  • and one of only a few this large in the United States
  • Registered
  • Bonded
  • Insured

 

2019

Awarded BEST PET SITTER

 

2016

We WON again

FINALIST in BEST Pet Sitting and BEST Dog Walker 

2015

Awarded BEST PET SITTING

and BEST DOG WALKER

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Award Winning Pet Sitting Company Multiple Times

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We are the ONLY pet sitting company that :

  • Has 30+ Pet Sitters on staff, most have been with us for 3 – 14 years
  • Has a large working emergency back up system to ensure pet care
  • Has 3000+ clients from Nashua to Concord
  • Cares for THOUSANDS of pets in a month

 

Superior Credentials:

  • Pet Sitting Business Experience since 1990
  • Our pet sitters live in the areas they service to
    always be close to the pets they care for.
  • for pet & client protection, we have:
    • 30+ Trained and Police Checked Employees
    • 40+ page Policy & Procedure Handbook
    • Non-disclosure/confidentiality contracts
    • Non-compete, our sitters can not do any of our services outside of our company during employment and years after leaving our company
  • Medical Pet Care Technicians on staff in most areas
  • Some Pet Sitters are Vaccinated Against Rabies

 

Dorinne Whynott, Owner of Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

  • Dog Behaviorist/Obedience Trainer
  • Pet Owner Counselor
  • Bachelor of Science Degree, Studies in Psychology, Animal Science and Business
  • Rehabilitator of Problem/Abused Animals
  • Rescues Animals in Need
  • Fosters animals for various organizations
  • NH Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator
  • Vaccinated Against Rabies
  • Certified Animal Abuse Investigator (UNH)
  • Certified Animal Disaster Responder by
    • FEMA,
    • Humane Society of the US,
    • American Humane Association

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HSUS Disaster Team 2006   HSUS Emergency Shelter 2006

American Humane 2006

 

  • Over 30 years of progressive experience in
    • Animal Rescue, Health and Welfare
    • Dog Behavior and Training
    • Animal Education to the Public
    • Pet Facilitated Therapy

Pet Therapy 1996

Associations & Memberships Include:

  • National & International Association of Professional Pet Sitters
  • American Humane Association
  • Humane Society of the United States
  • Associated Humane Societies
  • International Wolf
  • NH Equine Humane Association
  • Association of Pet Dog Trainers