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Why Does My Cat……

Cat talking

Hi, How Are You?
How does your cat get your attention?

.

.

Ever Wonder Why

.

Your Cat Does certain Things?

.

Let’s Find Out…

.

.

 Author, Darlene Wagner for Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

It’s estimated that 30 – 37% of households in the U.S. include at least one cat, with the total number of cats in the U.S. somewhere in the 74+ million range. Yep… that’s a lot of cats! And of that 74+ million, how many do we truly understand when it comes to why they do what they do? You got that right… not a one!

 

Obviously, cats are the preferred choice of pet for many of us, despite their mysterious ways, bewildering behaviors and oddball obsessions. If you share your life with a furr-ever feline friend, there are likely numerous things she does that have you scratching your head and asking “why?” Well, maybe you can find some answers here!

 

…Head Butt Me?

 

Believe it or not, this is actually a form of feline affection. By rubbing against you – or head “bunting” you – Fluffy is marking you with her scent, claiming you as her own. You see, cats have scent glands all over their body, with the most concentrated area being their heads, with glands under the chin, around the mouth, on the ears and at the temples. When she knocks heads with you, it’s because you are important to her and she wants everyone to know it!

 

…Meow at Me?

 

While Fluffy’s meowing likely isn’t constant, it can sometimes get to the point where it’s just plain annoying. Kittens learn to meow to let their mother know when they’re cold, hungry or scared. But as cats get older, their meowing is reserved specifically for communicating with their humans. And when Fluffy is meowing directly at you, she likely wants something, whether it be food, a treat, attention, or to say “hey, you, go clean my litter box!”

 

Chances are, when Fluffy meows at you, you respond. After time, it’s as if the two of you are actually having a conversation. Cats are smart and it doesn’t take them long to learn meowing yields results.

 

Now, if your cat meows non-stop, the only true way to end the madness is to remove the reinforcement she receives when she meows. This is much easier said than done, as most cats aren’t keen on change and their mild-mannered meows may turn into horrid howls. Sometimes, it’s purely a matter of choosing the lesser of two evils if you want to maintain your sanity!

 

Keep in mind, excessive meowing and other vocalization such as howling, growling and hissing can also indicate your kitty is feeling anxious, experiencing age-related changes, or is in pain. If this seems to be the case, seek advice from your veterinarian.

 

…Bite When Petted?

 

How many times have you been sitting comfortably on your couch, Fluffy in your lap purring with pleasure as you rub her when, suddenly and with no warning, you feel her razor sharp teeth sink into your hand? As we all know, cats are finicky, fickle creatures and these “love bites” tend to happen when Fluffy has decided “okay, I’ve had enough.” While this type of aggression isn’t fully understood by animal researchers, a common theory suggests most cats simply like being in control, and by nipping you when she’s had enough canoodling, Fluffy is taking control of the situation.

 

Cats definitely have their fair share of quirks, but it’s those quirks that make them the unique, entertaining, charismatic companions we know and love!

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If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

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All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

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What is Feline Stomatitis

Cat crying

Ow, I don’t feel good!

Signs, Symptoms and what can you do

Author, Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

 

 

We’ve all heard of gingivitis, that nasty swelling of our mouth’s tissues that can give us such oral distress as painful ulcers, bleeding and tenderness and can lead to periodontal disease if not treated. Well, did you know your cat can suffer the same fate if you don’t care for her teeth as you do your own? That’s right, cats can develop a disease known as feline stomatitis which, unfortunately, is quite common in adult cats.

 

It’s not known what the exact cause of feline stomatitis is, but it sometimes develops due to untreated tartar and plaque on the cat’s teeth. However, a great deal of feline experts believe the disease is the result of an over-active immune system which encourages the bacteria in the cat’s mouth to attack its own tissues. This immune system disorder can be contributed to feline conditions such as:

 

  • Nutritional imbalances
  • Food sensitivities or allergies
  • Chemical toxicity from exposure to environmental chemicals, plastics and preservatives
  • Chronic viral infections such as feline immunodeficiency virus, the herpes virus and bartonellosis (commonly known as cat scratch disease)
  • Stress

 

So, how do you know if your favorite feline might suffer from stomatitis?

 

Common signs that your feline may have the disease include bad breath (though not always a symptom) and pain in her mouth. Since your cat can’t tell you whether or not she’s in pain, look for indications that she’s experiencing a painful mouth, such as:

 

  • She often paws at her mouth
  • She drools excessively, and the drool may sometimes contain blood
  • Her appetite decreases, or she refuses to eat at all
  • She doesn’t groom herself as often as she once did
  • Her behavior has changed, for example, she’s being more clingy than usual, or she’s been hiding often

 

How do you know for sure that your cat has stomatitis?

 

If you notice any of the above signs, make an appointment with your cat’s veterinarian for a check-up. Be aware, kitty may need to be anesthetized in order to allow a thorough examination of her mouth and to prevent any undue pain during the exam.

 

While under anesthesia, the vet may opt to clean kitty’s teeth and, perhaps, get a gum tissue sample for lab review. And x-rays may be necessary to determine the extent of the disease. As well, specific blood tests may be done to check for the chronic viral infections mentioned above.

 

If it is determined your cat does indeed have stomatitis, what can be done?

 

Treatment of stomatitis varies depending on what caused the disease in the first place. With some cats, teeth extraction is necessary in order to remove the mouth surfaces that are often attacked by the bacteria that causes the disease. In others, antibiotics, steroids and/or pain medications may do the trick.

 

Also helpful during treatment and for the remainder of your cat’s life is the maintenance of good oral hygiene, including tooth-brushing, oral additives in your cat’s water dish, and treats that are made specifically for tooth-care.

 

You can also focus on providing your cat with a high protein, low carbohydrate diet with a protein source not previously encountered by your cat’s digestive system. As well, CoQ10 and zinc supplements have been shown to combat stomatitis.

 

So, as you can see, proper dental care is as crucial for your cat’s health as it is for your own. By paying attention to your cat’s behavior, maintaining a good oral health regime, and possibly changing your cat’s diet you can keep that pesky and painful stomatitis at bay!

 

 

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If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials (Darlene Wagner)

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

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Is Your Cat At Risk For Kidney Failure?

orange kitten

Could I have Kidney Disease?

Chronic Renal Failure in Cats

Author,  Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

Overview

Chronic renal failure in cats is also known as chronic kidney disease, kidney failure, or chronic renal insufficiency.  It refers to a degeneration of the kidneys that has been progressing over a period of months or years.  The damage to the kidneys is irreversible and although there is no cure, supportive treatment can delay the progression of disease to increase the quality of life for the elderly feline.

 

Symptoms

Symptoms of kidney failure can vary depending on the severity and progression of disease.  Common symptoms include:

  • Increased thirst (polydipsia) and increased urination (polyuria)
  • Incontinence or leaking urine
  • Decreased appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Vomiting (diarrhoea may also be present)
  • Lethargy and weakness

 

As the disease progresses additional symptoms that can develop include:

  • Poor hair coat
  • Halitosis (bad breath)
  • Pale gums
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Cold body temperature

 

Causes

Kidney damage in cats occurs when the kidneys ability to function and remove waste products from the blood is impaired.  Chronic renal failure refers to damage that has occurred over a course of weeks, months, or years resulting in inflammation and non-functional scar tissue.

Kidney failure in cats is most commonly idiopathic (of unknown origin), however there are several underlying conditions that can contribute to kidney disease:

  • Reoccurring bacterial kidney infections
  • Tumors in the kidneys
  • High blood pressure
  • Diseases that affect the immune system
  • Toxicities
  • Polycystic kidney disease in certain breeds of cat (Persians, Abyssinian)
  • Congenital kidney defects

 

Diagnosis

Alongside a full history and veterinary examination, common pathways in the diagnosis of chronic renal failure in cats include blood tests, urinalysis, and diagnostic imaging.

Physical examination may reveal dehydration, enlarged lymph nodes, signs of anemia such as pale mucous membranes, and dilated pupils.  The veterinarian will also palpate the abdomen to feel for kidney abnormalities such as nodules or irregular sizing.

 

Blood testing

Blood tests are performed to determine abnormalities related to renal failure along with any complications that have developed due to decreased kidney function.  Blood values assessed include blood urea nitrogen, creatnine, phosphorus, amylase, and a red blood cell count.

 

Urinalysis

The urinalysis is a complete assessment of urine components.  Kidneys play an important role in the dilution and concentration of urine.  Cats with chronic renal failure often have dilute urine along with excess protein in the urine.  The urine sediment will also be examined under a microscope to look for the presence of cast cells associated with renal failure.

 

Diagnostic imaging

Diagnostic imaging may involve radiographic or ultrasound evaluation of the kidneys.  Radiographs are useful in visualizing the kidneys, checking for calcification associated with renal failure, and assessing the urinary system for stones.  Ultrasonography is more sensitive and helps to determine the size and internal anatomy of the kidneys.

 

Treatment

Initial treatment is aimed at supportive therapy in order to stabilize the cat’s overall condition and correct dehydration as well as electrolyte imbalances.  There is no cure for chronic renal failure in cats.

After initial stabilization and therapy, treatment is aimed at prolonging kidney function and increasing the quality of life.  The aim is to reduce the workload on the kidneys, replace electrolytes that are lacking, and to decrease the accumulation of waste materials.  Ongoing treatment involves a combination of life-long medications and dietary management in order to counteract symptoms of renal failure and slow the progress of disease.

Kidney transplantation is available at specialized veterinary universities, however it is not commonly performed to due to the high cost and risk of complications.  Even after a kidney transplant, cats need to be kept on life-long medications and immuno-suppressive therapy.

Ongoing monitoring of renal failure is vital for monitoring the progression of disease and ongoing quality of life.  Cats that have been diagnosed with chronic renal failure should be reassessed by the veterinarian every 3 – 6 months including a blood panel and urinalysis.

Chronic renal failure in cats has a guarded prognosis, but with early diagnosis an effective management plan can be formulated to slow disease progression.

 

Prevention

Although there is no cure or preventative treatment against kidney disease, there are a few steps owners can take to slow the process of damage.

 

Health and wellness screenings

Overall health plays a crucial role in a cat’s predisposition for chronic renal failure.  Cats should be kept in good health and treated promptly for any disease or infections.  Yearly veterinary check ups should include vaccinations and dental scale and polishing if needed.  Senior cats over the age of eight will benefit from a yearly screening involving blood and urine tests.

 

WATER

Water is the ONE absolute thing you can do to help the kidneys function best. Cats are easily dehydrated.  when cats are dehydrated it makes the kidneys work harder to flush their systems.  Feeding dry food further dehydrates your cat.  Feed 90-100% moist canned food.   Ultimately, feeding at least twice a day of approximately 3 ounces of canned food at each time will help.  Adding 1/4 cup more water to each meal, will also help.  See our article on Feeding Cats by Gus Bennett to learn more.

 

Limiting exposure to toxic substances

As toxins are filtered through the kidneys, exposure to toxic substances should be limited.  Toxins include antifreeze, lilies and other plants, grapes and raisins, diets consisting solely of fish, and over-use of certain medications.

 

Understanding genetic connections and being aware of the signs of disease

Owners should be aware of possible genetic connections to chronic renal failure in cats.  Breeds such as Persians and Abyssinians have an increased prevalence of chronic renal failure.

It is important to be aware of the clinical signs of renal failure as listed above and seek prompt veterinary diagnosis and treatment.  Ongoing management and monitoring will play a vital role in delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease and increasing a cat’s overall quality of life.

 

**********************************************************************************

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials (Stacey Kalinnikova, BVetTech)

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

Share

Is Your Cat Spraying?

black cat and sunflower

Hmmmm, not fond of these flowers, let me make them smell better.

Cats and Spraying ~

What Is It,

Why Do They Do It,

and How Can You Control It?

.

 Author,  Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

As the parent of a purr-fectly pawsome cat, you may have confused urine spraying with actual urinating, even though the behaviors are quite different and represent different things. Obviously, urinating is your cat’s sanitary method of discharging urine, as it is for animals and people alike. But urine spraying is a behavior that has nothing to do with your cat’s sanitation; instead, it is a territory-marking behavior. Most commonly done by non-neutered males in a multi-cat household, urine spraying on furniture, carpet and other household surfaces is your cat’s way of saying “hey, this is my turf!” and to cover up the scent of other cats. The behavior is quite normal and natural, but it should be prevented if you want to keep a sanitary, odor-free home.

 

How to Control Your Cat’s Spraying

 

  1. First and foremost, have your kitty spayed or neutered by the time he/she is six months old, if possible. Mostcats who are “fixed” generally do not spray  However, spraying can even occur with neutered males and spayed females, especially if you have waited to neuter a male cat after he has reached sexual maturity; by then, spraying may have become a fixed habit to him.

 

  1. Attempt to restrict your cat’s view of the outdoors. If your cat sees another cat, it is his natural response to mark his territory, which just happens to be your home. Provide your cat with a cat tree or play area to refocus his attention from the great outdoors.

 

  1. Foster a positive relationship amongst multiple cats. When cats get along, they are less competitive, which makes them less likely to spray. Be sure to give each cat equal attention, play with them together and encourage them to sleep and eat together.

 

  1. Keep a routine. Changes in your household – rearranging the furniture, moving your cat’s litter box, welcoming a new pet to the family – can create anxiety for your cat. Try to keep the status quo whenever possible by feeding kitty at the same time each day, keeping her bed and litter box in the same location at all times, engaging in playtime at a regular time, etc. If you notice your cat has a problem remaining calm and stresses easily, you may opt to try a pheromone-like spray substance that is specifically designed to help your cat keep her calm.

 

  1. When your cat does spray, immediately and thoroughly clean the area to prevent re-marking. Opt for a product that contains natural enzymes that will “eat” the odor-causing bacteria. Some products merely mask the scent, which is not a long-term solution.

 

  1. Finally, if all else fails and stopping your cat’s spraying seems like a never ending battle, try to repel your cat with unpleasant essences or experiences. There are products available that can be used to keep your pet away from areas that are his obvious favorites when it comes to spraying. For instance, Pet Safe Ssscat Cat Spray is an automated spray system that detects when your pet is in a forbidden area and releases a brisk, odorless, harmless and stainless spray that may help disrupt your cat’s undesirable spraying behavior. Another Product, Contech Stay Away does the same exact thing, but also has a warning beep first.  Allowing the cat to move away before the spray of air.

 

While your cat’s spraying is definitely a nuisance, it’s not a necessity. When you witness your cat spraying or recognize that he has, take action soon in order to achieve successful results.

**********************************************************************************

 

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 (DW)

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

Share

Can Pets Have Vertigo?

Missy and Buster

Missy and Buster

Vestibular

Disorder

in

Cats and Dogs

.

.

Author, Darlene Wagner for Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

Vestibular disorders, such as Meniere’s disease and vertigo, are not unique to humans. Even our dogs and cats can be afflicted when there is irritation to the nerves that connect the vestibular (inner ear) organs to the brain. The organs provide the brain with important information about body position with respect to gravity. Sensory information from your pet’s vestibular system tells him if he is upside down, right-side up, turning, falling, accelerating, slowing down, etc. This information also coordinates with sensory information from vision and proprioception (touch sensors in the paws and other parts of your pet’s body) to help your pet maintain balance and keep a clear field of vision when moving.

 

There are two forms of vestibular disorder – peripheral and central. Most cats and dogs are stricken with the peripheral form (inner ear), with the central form being less common but much more serious, originating inside the central nervous system (brain).

 

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Vestibular Disorder?

 

Signs of vestibular disease include stumbling or staggering, head tilting or shaking, falling or rolling to one side, spinning or walking in circles, or sudden motion sickness, as well as involuntary, rhythmic and jerky eye movements. Secondary signs can include nausea, vomiting and excessive drooling. Perhaps one day you notice your cat’s usual streamlined and graceful movements have become awkward and uncertain, or your dog’s love for a good game of fetch has been hampered by disorientation and lack of coordination – these can be signs of vestibular disorder.

 

In older animals, vestibular disorder is often mistaken for a stroke, as the vertigo caused by the disorder can be especially intense, mimicking some signs of a stroke. It can also make simple activities like eating, drinking and eliminating quite difficult. In cases like this, supportive therapy in the form of IV fluids or nutritional supplements may be necessary. A pet-friendly calming agent such as chamomile or passionflower may also prove helpful, as the symptoms of vestibular disorder can be very stressful to senior pets.

 

What Causes Vestibular Disorder?

 

The cause of peripheral vestibular disorder in pets may include a middle ear infection, genetic sources, head trauma, an underactive thyroid gland, or a central nervous system issue, like a brain lesion. Often times, however, the exact cause can remain undetermined.

 

How is Vestibular Disorder Diagnosed and Treated?

 

Schedule an appointment for you and your furry friend to visit a veterinarian if you suspect vestibular disorder. Your vet will conduct proper testing, including a physical examination and a neurological assessment, which will determine if the disorder is peripheral or central. If the peripheral form is diagnosed, an otoscope will be used to view the depths of your pet’s ear. Your vet may also conduct additional tests such as x-rays and blood tests to rule out any other possible causes of your pet’s symptoms.

 

Treatment depends on the diagnosis. For example, if an ear infection results in the inflammation of tissues and nerves of the vestibular system, an important part of treatment will be to eliminate the infection. If your pet is diagnosed with the more common peripheral vestibular disorder, your vet will likely prescribe motion sickness medications to alleviate your pet’s nausea and vomiting. Fortunately, this form improves quickly in most cases, once the underlying cause is addressed and symptoms of vertigo are managed with supportive care.

**********************************************************************************

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

Share

Could Your Cat Be Diabetic?

kitten sleeping on a soft blanket, diabetic cat

Diabetic Cat

Feline Diabetes, Prevention & Care

Author, Stacey Kalinnikova, BVetTech for Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

 

Overview

Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder resulting from a deficiency of insulin.  Insulin originates from the pancreas and is involved in the regulation of glucose flow from the bloodstream to the body cells.  Glucose in the cells is required for energy and metabolism.  If the insulin in the body is insufficient, glucose will begin to build up in the bloodstream and the body will start to break down alternative energy sources such as fat and protein.

There are two types of diabetes mellitus in cats:

Type 1 – Occurs due to a lack of insulin, this type is uncommon in cats.

Type 2 – Occurs when the body cells lose the ability to respond to insulin.  As the disease progresses, the body will also develop a lack of insulin.

 

Causes

 The exact cause of diabetes mellitus in cats is unknown.  Predisposing factors include:

  • Obesity
  • Other hormonal disorders
  • Chronic pancreatitis
  • Prolonged use of certain medications such as corticosteroids or progestogens

 

Symptoms

 Common signs of feline diabetes include:

  • Increased thirst
  • Increased urination
  • Change in appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Poor hair coat
  • Lethargy
  • Weakness
  • Seizures
  • Frequent vomiting
  • Predisposition to secondary bacterial infections

 

Diagnosis

 Diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in cats is based on clinical signs, thorough physical examination, and laboratory testing.

Physical examination may reveal a change in weight, dehydration, poor hair coat, and the veterinarian may be able to palpate an enlarged liver and kidneys.  Other common diseases in cats can have similar clinical signs so additional testing is necessary.

Urinalysis (analysis of a urine sample) is performed to determine the presence of glucose and ketones in the urine.  Glycosuria (glucose in the urine) is an indication of diabetes, while ketonuria (ketones in the urine) will reveal ketoacidosis.  Blood tests will reveal high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia) indicative of diabetes.

While persistent hyperglycaemia and glycosuria indicates diabetes, a one off result could be a cat’s normal response to stress.  Therefore, it is often necessary to repeat blood and urine tests to confirm the diagnosis.

Additional blood tests can check the serum fructosamine level, which can reveal the average blood glucose levels over the past week.  A supplementary chemistry panel may show increased liver enzymes and high cholesterol, as well as a decrease in potassium, sodium, and phosphorus levels.

 

Treatment

Treatment of diabetes in cats generally involves a complementary approach between injectable insulin or oral hypoglycaemic medications and dietary management.

Injectable insulin

 An injection of insulin is administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once or twice daily.  The insulin dose required is determined by the veterinarian administering a dose in-clinic and performing a blood glucose curve to check the blood sugar response over a certain time period.

Injections can be given at home after demonstration of the correct technique by the veterinary team.  Insulin must be stored in the refrigerator and injections should be given on a strict schedule each day to avoid complications.

 Oral hypoglycaemic medications

 A small percentage of diabetic cats can be treated with oral hypoglycaemic medications that work to lower glucose levels in the blood.  Frequent glucose monitoring is required and many cats will still require injectable insulin in conjunction with oral medications.

 Dietary management

 Dietary management is an important complementary factor to medications.  It is first important to normalise the body weight of overweight cats, which is usually achieved with a reduced calorie diet.  A long-term dietary change for diabetic cats is often required in the form of specifically formulated veterinary diets that are low in carbohydrates or high in fiber with a complex carbohydrate ratio.

Food intake must be closely monitored with a strict feeding routine.  Diabetic cats should be fed half of their daily food intake at the same time as their insulin injections.  Depending on whether or not the cat eats at the given times, the veterinarian may wish to delay the injection.

 

Management & Monitoring

 Without ongoing management and monitoring at home, cats are at risk of developing hypoglycaemic episodes or life-threatening ketoacidosis.

Home management involves regular insulin injections, blood glucose monitoring, urine monitoring, body weight assessment, and close monitoring of appetite and drinking.

Insulin injections

Insulin must be given on a strict schedule as prescribed by the veterinarian.  It is important to adhere to regular feeding and injection times as skipping or delaying one dose can result in serious complications.

 Blood glucose and urine monitoring

Blood glucose can be tested at home to check levels for adequate response to insulin and feeding.  The glucometer requires a small drop of blood which is usually taken from the ear or paw pad.  Urine glucose monitoring can also be performed in the home, however is not ideal as the results are not as accurate as blood testing.

Diabetic cats require close monitoring and daily care.  It can be stressful for cats to be taken to a veterinary clinic or boarding facility each time owners go away on holiday.

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. provides an in-home service for the care of diabetic patients.  

Taking your cat to a boarding facility is highly stressful for cats and a diabetic cat that is stressed can influence your cat’s health.

Contact us when booking your next holiday and we will be happy to answer any questions or concerns you may have about leaving your diabetic cat at home while you are away.

 

Resources

 Helpful resources containing information for owners of diabetic cats include:

 

Handling, Storing & Administering Insulin to Cats

Link: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1+2130&aid=258

 

Hypoglycaemia Quick Reference – How to treat hypoglycaemia

Link: http://www.felinediabetes.com/hypo-emergency.htm

 

Glucose toxicity and hypoglycaemia

Link: http://www.vetsulin.com/vet/Cats_AboutDiabetes_Glucose.aspx

 

Cat Hospital of Chicago – Diabetes Mellitus in Cats Overview

Link: http://www.cathospitalofchicago.com/online-cat-health-library/diabetes-mellitus-in-cats

 

Blood Glucose Curves in the Diagnosis & Regulation of Diabetes in Cats

Link: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1+2130&aid=256

 

Glucose curve generator tool

Link: http://www.vetsulin.com/vet/Tools_GlucoseCurve.aspx

 

Diet as an Aid to Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus in Cats

Link: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1+2130&aid=198

 

How To Test Your Diabetic Cats Blood Sugar At Home (Video)

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zE12-4fVn8

 

How to Give Your Diabetic Cat an Insulin Injection (Video)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeZgKLfIJn4

 

**********************************************************************************

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

 

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

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Kitten Care Basics

Feed Me !! Kittens need extra nutrition to grow Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Feed Me !! Kittens need extra nutrition to grow
Professional Pet Sitting Etc

 

The Basics of Kitten Care

   Author,  Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

Congratulations! You’ve just welcomed a precious little fluff ball to your family, complete with kneading, meowing, stalking, pawing and purring. Sure, your new kitten is bound to bring you years of love and fun, but before you get too cozy with Fluffy, make sure you’ve taken the time to learn the cat care basics.

 

Eat, Drink and Be Merry

There are not steadfast rules for feeding your furry bundle of joy; it’s up to you and your vet to decide the proper routine for your kitty. But, keep in mind, the kitten chow options available seem limitless, so do your research before settling on a food that may or may not be right for Fluffy. Cats need several different kinds of nutrients to survive: amino acids from protein, fatty acids and carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and water. Whether you choose wet or dry food, it should be higher in protein than in carbohydrates, which are not essential to your cat’s diet, but provide her with an abundant source of energy.

 

Side-by-side with nutrition, hydration is an extremely important part of your kitty’s health. Provide Fluffy with access to plenty of clean, lukewarm water and remember, milk is a no-no as many cats develop digestive problems with milk after they are weaned from their mom.

 

Training

Cats may have the reputation of being a bit more bossy and independent than dogs, but they can still be trained. While kittens, like puppies, don’t respond well to punishment after the fact – they’ll associate those negative feelings with you – it is possible to train Fluffy to stop unsatisfactory behavior if she’s caught in the act. Try using a spray bottle filled with water to notify her of no-no behavior when she jumps on the kitchen counter, nibbles on your fingers, or chews on the newspaper. She will learn to associate the unwanted behavior with the unpleasant yet safe sensation and it should subside.

 

Litter Box Behavior

Some veterinarians recommend having one litter box for every cat in the house, plus one extra. Opt for a larger box a low entryway or a ramp for your itty-bitty kitty and place it in a quite area of your home. Clean litter boxes at least once per day; cat’s don’t like dirty areas, and would prefer to do their business on a clean surface (even if it is your carpet!) as opposed to an unkempt litter box.

 

Veterinary Care

Most kittens begin their core vaccines at around eight weeks of age, and healthy cats should receive routine vet check-ups at least once per year. In the U.S., there are more cats than dogs as pets, yet they receive less than half the veterinary care provided to their canine counterparts. Many factors that drive this deficiency abound, including the idea that cats are self-sufficient and therefore don’t need vet care as often; the cat’s ability to mask signs of illness; and even issues such as the hassle of getting Fluffy into her carrier can lessen her trips to the vet. Another popular reason for the lack of veterinary care for cats is their human’s assumption that, since their kitty never leaves the house, she isn’t exposed to the potential health hazards that a dog who goes outdoors faces. When you take on the responsibility of welcoming a kitten to your family, keep in mind the importance of veterinary care.

 

While there are so many other factors included in keeping your kitty happy and healthy – such as playtime, treats, grooming and sleeping – the items above serve as a good starting point for introducing your new kitty to her new home and positively contributing to her well-being.

 

*************************************************************************************

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

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Are You & Your Home Ready for a Cat

Are you ready for a cat? Professional Pet Sitting etc

Are you ready for a cat?
Professional Pet Sitting etc

.

Are You Ready

to Welcome a

Cat into Your

Home and Life?

.

.

   Author, Darlene Wagner for Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

Having a cat (or two, or three…) in your life is a wonderful, rewarding experience. But, out of fairness to all parties concerned, it’s very important that you make sure a cat is a good fit for you and your household.

 

It’s widely accepted that our feline friends are less emotionally dependent than our canine companions, but they still require your attention, time, money, and a serious and long-term commitment. While they make wonderful companions, you need to be certain that by welcoming a cat into your home and your life, you’re going to be in it for the long haul. Start by considering the following:

 

Ask yourself, “Why Do I Want a Cat?”

 

  • For companionshipCats are very social creatures and they bring a lot of love into a home. If you fantasize about curling up on the sofa with a good book, and a kitty purring in your lap, a cat may be a welcome addition to your family.

 

  • For healthIt has been scientifically proven that living with a pet is good for you. It lowers blood pressure, encourages activity, and gives your life additional purpose. Obviously, the health benefits should not be the only reason you opt to open your home to a cat, but it is definitely an added benefit.

 

  • Out of impulseAvoid taking on the responsibility of any pet on a whim. It is a commitment that should always be taken seriously, and one for which you should be fully prepared.

 

  • For your child(ren)If your child has been begging and pleading for a cat, or you want to teach him to be more responsible, please reconsider. No matter how much your child pleads, or promised to take care of the furry family member, you will be the primary caregiver for any pet. If you yourself don’t want to be responsible, don’t get a cat.

 

  • Cats are easier than dogsSure, caring for a cat doesn’t require daily walks, playing fetch or regular bathing, and there are known for being more independent than dogs, but they need more attention and work than most people realize. Misinformation abounds about the necessary care for a cat ~ some people think they don’t need to be fed regularly because they are natural hunters, while others think regular wellness checks with the veterinarian aren’t necessary. If you’re considering welcoming a cat to you family because you think it will be easy, please reconsider.

 

Yes, there is a lot to consider before making the decision to share your life and home with a fabulous feline. It’s extremely important that you take the time to carefully consider whether or not a cat is a good fit for you, your family, and your lifestyle. Too many cats wind up in shelters because their former parents just weren’t ready to have them in the first place.

 

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

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This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

 

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Tips for Helping Your Cat Age Gracefully

Senior Cats are the best

Senior Cats are the best

.

Tips for

Helping Your

Senior Cat

Age Gracefully

and Comfortably

Author, Darlene Wager of Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

 

 

We love our pets, and want only the best for them throughout their lives and, especially, as they get older. If you’re the parent of a cherished cat entering her golden years, there are some things you can do to help her age gracefully and comfortably.

 

Nutrition.

 

Feed your senior a balanced, antioxidant rich, feline-appropriate diet that includes omega-3 essential fats, such as krill oil. Moisture is an aging cat’s best friend, so encourage adequate hydration by providing a variety of water bowls throughout your house, in addition to minimizing dry food, which contains minimal water. If your cat is addicted to poor-quality dry food, try adding a whole body supplement, such as Standard Process Feline Whole Body Support.

 

Supplements.

Provide your kitty with a SAMe (S-adenosylmethionine) supplement as a safe and effective way to stall or improve mental decline, improve mobility, and assist in liver detoxification. Some researchers believe SAMe may also be helpful in other conditions related to the damage of cell membranes such as diabetes, pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, anemia, Cushing’s disease, autoimmune disorders and certain heart conditions. Consult with your veterinarian to determine the proper dosage for your feline.

Coconut oil, a rich source of medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), has been shown to be safe for cats and can improve brain energy metabolism and decrease protein build-up that results in brain lesions in aging pets. It may even reduce your kitty’s hairball issues. Serve ¼ teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your cat’s body weight twice daily.

 

For aging kitties who prowl the house all night and vocalize (as many seniors do), consider a low dose of melatonin, which is a sedative with a calming effect that will help kitty sleep. Some vets even prescribe this supplement to treat mild feline anxiety, and it’s an effective antioxidant. Since melatonin is a hormone, not a drug, it has few side effects and can be used long-term. Again, consult with your vet regarding correct dosage.

 

Exercise.

 

Keep your cat’s mind and body active with regular exercise that is appropriate for her age and physical condition. Think of creative ways to enrich your cat’s indoor environment, like hiding bits of food or treats throughout the house, encouraging her to “hunt;” providing scratching posts and perches; and adding a shelf beneath a window so she can sit and watch the outdoor activities. Provide mental stimulation with puzzles and treat-release toys. And, of course, have regular playtime with your feline which not only serves as exercise, but also as much needed bonding time.

 

Routine.

 

Set aside time every day to socialize with your senior. Ensure meals are provided on a consistent schedule, along with playtime and petting/lap time. If your cat enjoys being brushed or combed, work that into the daily schedule as well, to assist her with her own grooming chores, as they may slack as she ages. If she’ll allow it, trim the hair around her private areas since her age likely impacts her ability to reach those areas on her own.

 

Sanitation.

As cats age, they may experience potty accidents.  If eliminating outside the litter box is an issue, try putting additional boxes around the house. Make sure kitty is comfortable when getting into and out of the box. Cats are masters when it comes to hiding arthritis and other aches and pains, which can limit their ability to climb into high-sided boxes, or boxes kept in bathtubs or up a flight of stairs, for example.

 

We wish our pets could live as long as we do but, sadly, that just isn’t so. Do anything and everything you can to ensure your favorite feline is comfortable, happy and as healthy as possible while she’s here.

 

 

 

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

 

 

 

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

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This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

 

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Flea Prevention in Cats

Itchy, I'm so itchy !!

Itchy, I’m so itchy !!

Fleas,

Ticks

and

Cats 

Author, Noelle Dunn of Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

 

 

The perfect setting for fleas and ticks to breed is the cozy, warm coat of cats. These nasty bugs feed on your pet’s blood and can cause a variety of health issues. There are steps you can take to keep them away from your furry friend.

 

Fleas and ticks usually attack together but are very different. A flea is considered an insect and has 6 legs. They cannot fly, but can jump a great distance. Ticks are related to spiders. They are tiny and have 8 legs. There are some other differences; fleas live about 100 days or so, while ticks can live a few weeks up to 3 years. Fleas will lay 20-40 eggs a day for up to several weeks. A tick can lay thousands of eggs at once. It is most common for fleas to dominate during warmer months but a tick thrives in both hot and cold climates.

 

If your cat has fleas and ticks you will notice persistent scratching. You should check your cat’s fur, focusing on the head, neck area, tail and feet.

Some signs your cat may have fleas and ticks:

 

Itching

Gnawing and licking

Hair Loss

Tapeworms

Pale lips or gums

 

The most common way animals contract fleas is from being outdoors. It only takes one flea or tick to be infected. Fleas can fall off their host animal onto the rug, furniture, and bedding.

 

You can keep your home flea and tick free by doing the following: clean rugs and upholstery often and the areas where your pet sleeps and eats. You should wash your pets bedding regularly. You can use an indoor fogger to kill fleas and ticks. For more severe cases, you may have to consult an exterminator. As you clean, focus on dark areas where fleas and ticks like to hide.

 

If you are going to treat your yard, keep in mind these bugs migrate to the dark, damp, shady spots. Always read directions thoroughly and repeat if necessary. Before treatment, pick up any leaves, loose branches or anything you don’t want to be affected by the chemicals.

 

You can prevent the spread of fleas and ticks by regular checkups and vaccinations. Cats are highly sensitive to insecticides. Some products that are intended for dogs should absolutely not be used around felines.  Check all labels before you buy. To be safe, you should consult with your veterinarian for the best methods of flea and tick prevention.

 

 

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

 

 

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

 

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