Cat Care

Orphan Kitten Care

Baby kitten, orphan kitten

Baby Felice as an orphan kitten

How to Care for An Orphan Kitten

Author, Dorinne Whynott, Owner of Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

 

Raising a young orphaned kitten can be very challenging, especially if you have never done it before. Well, the ideal solution is to find a nursing mother cat that’s willing to take on a new mouth to feed. If it is not possible, you will need to prepare for weeks of constant care so as to safely raise the young motherless kitten to a point of weaning.

In this article, were are going to give you a step by step guide on what to do if you have an orphan kitten.

Step 1 – Bring to a Veterinarian

If the Mom is just refusing to nurse the kitten, she may have something wrong.  Best to check her out.

If the kitten is orphaned, make sure that the baby is healthy.  They may have been orphaned because the Mom knows something is wrong or if you found this kitten outside, exposure may have put this baby in an unhealthy environment.  This baby may have parasites and a quick safe wormer may be in order.

 

Step 2 – Keep Warm

The first thing you need to is to make sure the orphaned kitten is kept warm in her nest (typically a box or crate). Young kittens that are less than 3 weeks old cannot regulate their body temperature, and can easily get chilled. You will need to improvise a safe warming center for a couple of weeks that’s kept in an isolated area of the house. You can prepare a nest that’s lined with towels, and then put a hot water bottle under the towels or a heating pad (on low, always have a towel between kitten and heat source). Make sure you leave it in a place where the kitten can easily crawl away if she gets too hot.

 

Step 3 – Kitten Formula

During the 1st 48 hours of life, kittens normally receive the vital antibodies from their mothers’ milk. This rather special milk (also known as colostrum), is secreted by the kitten’s mother for the 1st couple of days before it’s replaced by regular milk. A kitten that doesn’t receive the colostrum for the 1st few days usually has a fragile immune system. If the kitten was lucky enough to have nursed the first few days great but in many orphan cases we will never know.

In any case, it is recommend that you use powdered kitten milk replacement formula right from the start. The powdered kitten milk replacement formula is the cat’s equivalent of infant formula, and has the same composition as the milk from the kittens’ mother. KMR (kitten milk replacer) can be found in any pet store.  It can be found in powdered form (just add water) or ready to be fed as is.

NEVER feed cow’s milk because the lactose or sugar, will most likely upset the kitten’s stomach.

Before feeding the orphan kitten, remember to warm the formula up to body temperature just like you would a human baby.  You can test it on your wrist to make sure it is not too hot or cold.  Then feed via a syringe, a dropper, or baby nursing bottle. Make sure you keep the kitten in the upright position (on her stomach), so that the milk does not go into her lungs. Feed her slowly so she doesn’t choke. That said, it’s important to note that in the 1st week of life, a kitten should be fed every two to three hours. At 2 weeks, she can be fed every four to six hours. And after 3 weeks of age, she can be fed every six to eight hours.

 

Step 4 – Stimulate to go to the bathroom

Until the kitten is 4 weeks old, she will not able to go to the bathroom on her own. The Mother cat will help to keep the nest clean by gently washing the kittens genitals with her tongue and ingesting all elimination made by the kittens.

Since this is not something we will replicate exactly as mom would do, we will use a warm washcloth or cotton ball while on a paper towel.

After feeding, you would gently rub your kittens’ back to encourage a burp to help expel the air that was sucked in when she was feeding. Within 15 minutes after feeding, you can place the kitten on a few paper towels. Use a warm washcloth or moistened cotton pad or ball to gently massage her genitals and anal area.  Be gentle to prevent chafing. This will stimulate the elimination process, and the kitten will start to defecate or urinate. Keep massaging the area until she stops. Afterwards, gently pat the genital area dry so as to avoid infection and irritation.

The urine should be pale yellow, and the feces should be yellowish-brown in color. If you happen to notice green or white feces, or a dark urine which has a strong odor, the kitten might be dehydrated or needs immediate medical attention.

At around 3 weeks of age, you can offer a litterbox, use just a small amount of litter at first.  They may not use it right away but you will eventually see them start to use it.  Try using pellets, they are large enough to prevent lots of tracking and are made from paper or wheat and will not cause a blockage if eaten.  Unscented clay litter is also a possibility.  Try to avoid clumping or silica litters at this age which may cause a blockage if ingested.

 

Step 5 – Keep Kitten Clean

Once you have fed and helped the kitten eliminate, you will need to clean her. Take a warm, clean, damp cloth and stroke the orphaned kitten’s fur using short, gentle strokes. The strokes should emulate her mother’s tongue, just as she’d have cleaned her kitten. Doing this will give the kitten a pleasant feeling of well being, and also teaches her how to clean the fur as she gets older. Make sure you towel dry the kitten til she’s completely dry, before placing her back in the soft warm bedding.

 

Step 6 – Lots of handling

In order for the kitten to thrive, she’ll need a lot of affection from you, similar to the closeness she’d receive if she was living with her mother. Not only will this be a fun part of raising an orphaned kitten, but it’ll also bond her closely to you and turn her into an affectionate, cuddly cat. In addition to this, she will also need plenty of playtime as she grows. This time in a kittens life is a very formidable one.  This is where she will learn that humans are loving and caring.

 

Step 7 – Know when to go to the vet

Know when to take the motherless kitten to the veterinarian. As mentioned earlier, it is always a good idea to take the kitten to the veterinarian soonest possible to let them check for dehydration, parasites, and assess the kitten’s general health. That said, you need to know when to take the orphan kitten to the veterinarian for medical treatment. Babies can go down hill very fast, so do not hesitate.

You should take the kitten to the vet if you happen to notice;
-Vomiting
-A very low or high temperature
-Weight loss
-Lack of energy
-Breathing difficulties
-Discharge from the nose and eyes
-Lack of appetite
-Diarrhea
-Any kind of bleeding
-Coughing and sneezing
-Any kind of trauma, such as being stepped on, being hit by a car, among others.

 

Step 8 – Transitioning off formula

Around 3-4 weeks of age.  You can start adding use a small amount of pate canned cat food.  Just blend it very smooth so it can pass through the nipple of the bottle.

This will help the kitten feel fuller longer and will start transitioning the kitten to more solid foods.  As they do well with a little, you can add a bit.  After a few days, try mixing the pate canned food and formula in a bowl.  Make sure to put lots of paper towels or newspapers down, the kittens will make a mess until they figure out how to eat properly rather than sucking a bottle.  They will most definitely need a cleaning after feeding.  At 4 – 6 weeks, you can add more canned food with less formula until there is no formula at all.  Now you have successfully, weaned your kitten off formula and onto solid food.

 

Step 9 – Lots of play time

Ages 4 – 12 weeks.  This is the important time of play.  They learn how to wrestle, climb, jump and hunt.  Playing with siblings and with you helps them develop good social skills, mental and physical abilities.  This time is crucial in getting them socialized to become great housecats.

 

Step 10 – The Rest of Their Life

If you are fostering this kitten for a shelter, 8-12 weeks is about the time they will be going up for adoption.  You can safely let them go knowing YOU made a difference in this kitten’ life.

If you are trying to find this kitten a home on your own, do NOT let it go without doing all the work to make sure the potential home is a lifelong safe one.  This baby’s life depends on you and there are many people who seem nice but are not.  It is hard to find good homes and that is why most people will leave it up to the people who do it all the time, a shelter or animal rescue.  Here is some help but remember that YOU are responsible to find a safe home for this baby’s  – What to ask when you need to find a home for your pet.

If you have decided to keep this baby, then you have made a difference in not only the kitten’s life but also your own!! Congratulations !!

 

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Lost Cat

Lost Cat

I am scared. Please be patient with me.

What To Do Before, During and After

Your Inside Cat Gets Outside

Author, Dorinne Whynott, Owner of Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

If you own an indoor cat, one of your greatest fears is that the cat will get out. Cats are not like dogs when they get out.  Most cats will hide and they are very good at it.  Cats know they are considered prey for many animals even though they are hunters.  Most cats also hide because of fear.  They are in unfamiliar territory, so they want to observe from a very safe, enclosed space.  Many times, your cat may be a few feet from you but because your cat is very scared, they may not even move from that safe spot for days.  Almost frozen in fear.  So, what can you do.

 

Prevention is First

Step 1 –  Collar Your Cat

Get a collar that’s comfortable, and one that your cat can not remove easily. Collars for cats are going to be different then dogs.  Cat collars must be able to slip off their head or breakaway if a cat climbs on something and the collar becomes stuck.  You do not want the collar to harm your pet, so it must come off.  Collars do help, but you do not want to rely on just a collar to get your cat back.

 

Identification Tag

Your cat should always wear some kind of identification.  This will make it easy for anyone to notify you if they found your cat. Collar/tag should have your cat’s name (some people leave the name off), your name, your street address, and your phone number. Some tags are just fine with two phone numbers.  The second phone number can be a friend or relative.

We suggest an engraved tag that slips onto the collar, rather than a tag that attached via a metal ring.  Metal ring tags can get caught and fall off.

In case tags fall off, you can write some information on the collar using a permanent marker. Collars can also be embroidered with information as well but since cat collars are so small, you may just be able to get a phone number.

 

GPS tags

There are some GPS tags out there that people like.  These tags will let you know if your cat has left a certain area.  They can get you pretty close to where you cat is using an app on your phone.

 

Step 2 –  Microchip Your Cat

In today’s highly technological world, tracking your lost cat has never been easier. Thanks to microchip technology, many people have been reunited with their lost pets because of microchips. A microchip is a tiny implant between a cat’s shoulder blades, and it contains identifying information which an animal shelter or veterinarian can scan and find whom the cat belongs to. Some pets that have been missing for a very long time have found their way back to loving owner’s.  Another good thing about a microchip is once it is registered in your name, if there was ever a dispute that you owned your cat, a microchip could be used as proof of ownership.

Check your information with the microchip company at least once a year (especially if you move or change phone numbers). If you have made a birth date, do it every year on your pet’s birthday.  You can make one even if you do not know the exact date.  Take the estimated age at time of your pet’s adoption, that will give you a year.  Choose a month and day. Now your pet has a birthday!!

 

Step 3 –  Harness/Leash Train Your Cat

Your cat would love some outside time but you never want to let your cat roam free.  It is our responsibility as pet owners to keep our pets safe at all times. Cats that roam freely unsupervised are never safe from cars, wildlife, people, dogs, and other cats!  Their possible loss of life and safety are not worth it.

However, cats can easily be trained to go outside with you on harness and leash.  Always take them out through a door that you do not use for going to work.  For example if you use your front door or garage door to go to work every day, do NOT use those doors.  Use the door you go out to your back yard.  Why?  You want to train your cat that going out is only through that one door.  This way your cat will not try to go to work with you every day! In fact you want to discourage your cat from using those doors.

You want a harness that fits snuggly and prevents your cat from  slipping out or backing out of it.  A vest harness is best and fits snuggly around your cats body.  They come in all decorator colors now.

Never tie your cat outside and never leave your cat outside without you.  Cats can jump down or up on things and end up getting themselves in very harmful situations.

Why is this a good thing to teach your cat to be on harness and leash and go outside with you?  Well, it is nice for them to get some fresh air and sunshine, but also to get used to the sights and sounds when outside with you safely.  That way, if they ever do get outside by themselves, it will not be so traumatizing.  They will be calmer and most will run out and then stop waiting for you to come get them rather than running out , getting scared and taking off to hide.

I have trained my cats to be outside in my fenced in area.

Feel free to read the Two Ways To Keep Your Cats Outside Safely.

 

 

Step 5 – Train, Train, Train

Yes, all cats can be trained. Just like dogs, use repetition.  Every time you feed your cat, use your cat’s name and come or come here or supper time.  It really does not matter what you say, as long as you say the SAME thing for the same action.  This is because you want your cat to come when called.  That way if he does get outside, you can use the words they know and understand.

The best thing that can ever be trained is the recall.

 

Step 6 – Spay/Neuter your pets

All pets should be spayed/neutered.  Unneutered pets are going to escape to do what their hormones are telling them to do.  These pets can become lost in their quest. They will roam long distances to find a mate.  Spaying/neutering not only makes a happier pet but healthier as well as keeping down over population.

 

Step 7 –  Take Pictures of Your Cat

Today it is very easy to keep our pet photos up to date.  Take full body shots, head close ups, and any special markings.  Make sure the pictures are clear and crisp for identification. In case your cat goes missing, you will need these pictures to create posters and flyers. Include distinct identifying traits in the pictures so as to distinguish your cat from similar cats. Once you have taken the pictures, consider sharing them with family and friends, in case your computer crashes or phone is stolen. Facebook and icloud also make a good place to store photos.

 

Step 8 – Treat Training

Buy a can of treats or use a plastic Tupperware container filled with very small treats.  Find a container that makes some good noise when the treats are shaken in it.  Then every time you give your cat a treat, shake the container and say treat time (or whatever you choose, just use the same words).  This will train your cat to come for a treat when he hears the shaking treat container and also your words – treat time!!  This can be used outside as well.

Try to do this at various times, so it is never a routine time that you give treats.  Why? Because pets get very used to routines and when they get out, it is never at the time we want.  So, create a treat time whenever.  We want them hungry for treats so they come fast.

 

Step 9 – Make a Plan BEFORE to Act Fast

You have a better chance of finding your cat if you have a solid plan AND to have a solid plan when you are not upset and in crisis because your pet is lost.

Create a plan BEFORE something happens.  Know who to call and where to go.  Make a list of the town you live in and all border towns.  The Humane Society of the US recommends notifying everyone within a 60 miles radius.

Know every animal control officer and police station, list phone numbers.  Find out all Animal Hospitals, Animal Shelters and rescues in the above towns, with their contact information.

Make a complete description of your pet in writing, even create a lost poster. Take your time, research what is beneficial to place on posters.  Create this poster to have on hand to print and go.  You probably have a photo app that you can create and keep on hand, just changing the photo every now and then.  Create your poster to stand out.  Include your cat’s picture, breed (if purebred, if not choose DSH or DLH – domestic long/short hair), color, sex, age, weight, special markings and such other specifications. You can also include contact information like your name, phone number and email.  Have an area on the poster to fill in a few things last minute, such as – Date your cat went missing, Street and city where cat was last seen, description of collar, is your cat dragging a leash or has a harness on.  If your cat is very shy or has any behavior issues.

We suggest not putting your cat’s name on the posters and you may want to include – Do not chase, please contact owner. Why?  Some people may want your cat, so let’s not have your cat go to them by name and if your cat is frightened, having people chase after him will make them more frightened.  It is better to have people contact you with a sighting so you can go and calmly find your cat.

If this cat was adopted – contact the shelter you adopted from.  Many shelters do adopt with microchips and they may be contacted if the cat is found.

 

 

Your Cat Has Disappeared Outside, now what

In case your inside cat has gone missing, there are steps you can take to ensure a safe return of your beloved pet. In this article, we will highlight the steps you need to take to in order to find your lost indoor cat.

 

Step 1 – Check entire house, inside and out

Once you have established that your inside cat is missing, it’s natural to feel upset, but getting into a panic mode will not help you find your cat. However, taking immediate action can mitigate your anxiety. If you conduct a thorough search immediately, there is a good chance you will find your cat close to the area where it was lost. If more time passes, the cat will have a higher opportunity to roam further from your home.

Flashlight – bring a flashlight with you.  Why?  This is your secret weapon because you can shine it is dark places and the cats eye will shine back at you!! This works great in dark closets or anywhere at night. Just remember that other animal’s eyes will shine back at you as well, so make sure it is your cat!!

 

Step 2 – Check even the smallest places

Cats are very brilliant at keeping quiet, and many missing cats have been found in very unusual indoor hiding places. Make sure everyone has a flashlight as mentioned above. Cats can get into very tiny spaces, and can find extraordinary places to hide, which makes it rather tricky to find them. Before you head out, make sure you carefully check every cupboard in the house, including those you rarely use. Also check the inside of the washing machine and cozy places like in wardrobes and under the beds.

 

Step 3 – Try to See things from your cat’s point of view

Cats (even the neutered ones) are very territorial, and the cat’s territory was the inside the house. The moment your inside cat finds herself in unfamiliar outside world, she will get frightened and her immediate response is to look for shelter and hide in silence.

Remember, cats are prey as well as predator, so hiding is instinct for safety.

A cat is likely to find shelter within a few meters near the escape point, like under a porch, in the garage, inside the shed, in crawlspaces, or in a bush. The cat may also head upwards, onto the roofs or tree branches. You should let your neighbors know about the cat’s absence, and ask permission to look in their sheds, gardens and garages. If your neighbors have windows which face your home, you can ask them to keep an eye out for your cat.

 

Step 4 – Take your time looking and try to stay calm

When looking for your cat, take your time and call out your cat’s name, circling the area the cat was last seen. That said, do not assume the cat will respond to your voice as it normally does. Most lost cats are usually terrified, and might not want to leave their hiding spots even for you. Call quietly for the cat, using a gentle voice. Do not be too loud, as you run the risk of startling and frightening your cat even more. Many cats are so scared, they go into survival panic mode and freeze in a safe small space.

Here is where the treat can comes in handy.  If you have worked with your cat to come for treats, this just may break the trauma mode and your cat will come out. If not do not give up on the treat can.  Try the treat can every few hours or so.  If your cat keeps hearing it, they may feel comfortable enough to come out.

You can also bring along the cat’s favorite toy. If the cat has a beloved toy on a wand or string (like a stuffed mouse), you can take it with you when doing the search. Make the toy very visible, like you want your cat to play with you; doing this may help allay fears, and can bring your cat out of hiding. This helps if you know your cat is way under a porch but you can not get to them.  Sit quietly and keep playing with the toy, sometimes after a while your cat will focus on the toy instead of the fear and come out. If it is dark enough, don’t forget the laser light.  That light cat shine far and may get your cat to forget they are scared and come out.

As you walk around, remember to stop and listen regularly. A cat that’s trapped, hungry or hurt may meow. Whether you are searching with a group or by yourself, take a couple of minutes in every location you search to carefully listen for your cat’s meow. Pay close attention to sheds and garages where she might have been locked in or got stuck.

 

Step 5 – Hear is where your planning comes in handy

Call your local veterinary offices and the animal rescue centers with a clear description of your cat. Make sure the details you give them are up to date, and ask them if they would mind putting up a poster, or posting something on their social media profiles or website to help to find your missing cat. You should also consider checking the local animal shelters in person, at least once a week because even though you have given a description, many times your description and someone else’s may not be the same.  Best to see in person.

 

Step 6 – Print out and hang those posters

Print the posters and flyers that you made while you were preparing a while ago. Make sure all information is up to date. Distribute and post flyers wherever your missing cat was last seen, and throughout your neighborhood. You can also drop in places like post offices, shops, gyms, pubs and the local store, and ask them if they would mind displaying your flyer to help you find the missing cat.

 

Step 7 – Use Social Media & Document Sightings

Use various social media platforms to tell people you know that your cat is missing. You can add a post to the “Pets” and “Lost & Found” section on Craigslist; this has actually led to lots of reunions between missing cats and their owners. You can also use other social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter; this gives your neighbors and friends a visual reminder of the kind of cat to look out for.

Keep careful documentation of all sightings. Set out to put flyers in areas of each sighting. All animals will cross roads, highways, ponds, rivers, etc to get to wherever they think they are going or away from whatever may be chasing them.

 

Step 8 – Familiar Smell & Video

Most cats are generally still close to home and cats have a very good sense of smell.  Let’s use that and make your home outside familiar with their litterbox, cat bed, etc.

If you can open the door a little on the porch or garage, put all of these things in there to make it safe.  Buy an outside video camera or trail camera(at Walmart) and set it up to see if your cat is coming in.  Seeing your cat will go a long way for your peace of mind.  You can also set up the trail camera in places that your cat may be sighted.

 

Step 9 – You see your cat

Once you see your cat, do everything to get him to come to you.  Do not chase him, he may panic and run into traffic or farther away.  Shake the treat can.  Sit on the ground and toss treats out, use toys.  Try to stay there until your cat feels safe to come to you.  This may take a while, hours even, so be patient.  Try to not invade your cat’s space too much which may make them move.  They are much quicker then we are and you do not want to lose sight of them again.

You can rent a Hav-a-hart trap from the Concord SPCA.  They will give you instructions.  If you do this, you must check traps every few hours from far away.  If an animal is trapped inside, it is vulnerable to all kinds of harm and they can be more traumatized and scared.  Use binoculars to check the trap from a far distance.  Sometimes animals will wait to see that the trap is safe and not disturbed for hours before they get close enough to that yummy smelly food inside.  So you do not want to be seen anywhere near it but do want to see if anything is inside.  Hopefully not something you are not trapping!

Do not give up hope.  Cats have been returned to owners years later.  Especially if they have a microchip.

 

What To Do After Your Pet is Home

 

Step 1 – Take to the vet

After you have brought your lost cat home.  Check them all over for any wounds.  Make sure they look good.  If they look like their normal self.  Give them some water and half of a normal meal.  If they have been away for a few days or longer, they may have not eaten very much and may eat too fast and throw it up.  Then call your vet and get them in the next day.  Your veterinarian may see or find things that you may not see.  A hidden wound, will turn into an abcess.  I would also suggest bloodwork, just to make sure everything is okay.  They may have gotten into something or eaten something that was not good.  Best to check everything out now and be on the safe side.

 

Step 2 –  Eliminate Opportunities of escape

One of the most common ways a cat gets lost is bolting out doors. Teach your cat to stay away from all doors, especially front doors and doors to your garage.  Use a squirt bottle of water if they run to the door when someone comes.  Keep an eye on them as you open the door.  If you do not have a screen/storm door, install one.  This way you can talk to someone through that door without opening it.

Teach cats when people come, that after you let them in, go to the kitchen and shake the treat can.  That way if they do get out, they know that treats are coming and may hopefully run back in for treats.

Never take your cat out those doors without being in a carrier.  When going to the vet and they are in a carrier, Always make sure that carriers are secure.  Sometimes, people obtain a small carrier when cats ar kittens, then they grow and weigh more and the carrier is too small and flimsy for an adult cat.  Always make sure the fasteners are secure.  You can make them more secure using metal screws and bolts or zip ties with the fasteners (not just zip ties which can crack and break over time).

 

Step 3 – Fence your yard and use a cat Invisible Fence

If you can afford it, get your yard fenced and put in a cat invisible fence.  Invisible Fence is great but It does not PROTECT you or your cat.  So, fence your yard with a 6 foot fence or higher.  If you place that fence around the invisible fence, you can prevent your cat from going near the fence and climbing over or under. Using both fences will help keep your cat much safer.  Also, you will be safer because most wildlife and dogs can not come in.  Of course, never leave your cat outside unsupervised by you.  Your cat will have a ton of fun running around, exploring.  It is the best way to let your cat outside because they are safe.

You can also create catios.  These are another way for cats  to go outside safely.  Just google catios.  There are lots of them.

 

Step 4 –  Make Your Home Welcoming and Comfortable

You should make your home a place your cat likes to be. You can make your home a fun and happy place by creating cat areas in your home.  Lots of scratching posts in various shapes and sizes.  Cat beds and lots of toys.  Do not forget the catnip!  There is also puzzle feeders for cats.

Create Kitty TV – put bird feeders outside a window.  This way your cat can watch them coming and going.  Just be careful if you have bears in your area.  Otherwise the bears will rip them down.  Birdseed is like bear candy.

Exercise – giving your cat as much exercise as possible helps to wear off that energy.  Give them at least 30 minutes of fun exercise a day.  Giving your cat regular exercise helps curb boredom and those who think about escaping.

What if I do not have the time?  We all lead busy lives.  Have you thought of hiring a pet sitter?  Professional Pet Sitting Etc can come to your home every day while you are at work. We can play with your kitty and break up the long boring days.  We have lots of different lengths of time to fit most budgets.

 

Step 5 –  Train Your Cat

If you did not have time to train your cat before they got out, now is the time to start training. Train them to stay away from doors, on harness & leash, to come for treats.  It takes most cats 2 – 4 weeks to train, if you are consistent, use the same gestures and words. Cats must have patience When you train.  They take a bit longer then dogs only because they have to feel it is their idea.  They are cats after all!!

Training gives both your cat and the owner more things to do together.

Simply said, training your cat gives you both a platform of communication.  It gives boundaries and your cat will respect those boundaries when they understand them. It also increases the quality of the relationship when you both understand one another.

 

We hope that this article was informative and helpful to you.  We want all pets to stay safe and happy.

 

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If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

 

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on “New Client” to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

 

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Cat Enrichment Games

Young cute cat playing with a stick toy. The British Shorthair pedigreed kitten with blue gray fur

Did you know that Professional Pet Sitting Etc offers daily play sessions for your cat while you are at work? Call Us

Play is Essential To Keep Your Cats Young and Healthy,

Mentally As Well As Physically

Author, Dorinne Whynott, Owner of Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

Do you have regular play sessions with your cat?  Cats, just like dogs will benefit from regular play.

Cats are intelligent and fine tuned creatures that enjoy enrichment games which allow them to express their natural behaviors. They can jump incredible heights, can hear from miles away, and can easily navigate through the dark using their night vision. Cats have many talents which if not used properly can lead to negative behaviors like aggression, anxiety, over grooming, loss of appetite, self mutilation, urination problems, stress, depression, among others. Providing your cat with enrichment games can help increase activity, reduce stress, decrease any mental stagnation, help shy pets and prevent the aforementioned behavioral issues.

In this article, we are going to give you the best enrichment games for cats.

Food Puzzles
Food puzzles is an enrichment game for cats which requires the cat to take time and figure out how to get the ultimate prize (that is, treats or food), from a sealed container. This is one of the best games to stimulate cats mentally. Food puzzles for cats can be as easy as cutting a tiny hole in a sealed yogurt container, and putting some yummy treats inside, and then watching the cat paw and roll it around as he/she tries to get the treats out.

Any clean plastic container with a lid can also be used to make a hanging food puzzle. You just need to cut 2 or 3 holes around the plastic container’s bottom outer edge, and then place some treats at the center. After that, you can string a cord or rope through the secure lid and hang the food puzzle over the door handle. Once the cat becomes good at the game, you can encourage more exercise by raising the hanging food puzzle higher.

Scratching Post
Scratching comes naturally to cats. Cats need to scratch to exercise, sharpen their claws, and mark their territory. In order to keep your cat physically and mentally stimulated, and to prevent him/her from scratching on the carpets, curtains and furniture, you should buy or make an appropriate scratching post. You should know that cats like scratching on various different surfaces and positions. There are some cats that prefer vertical scratching posts, while others prefer horizontal/floor scratching mats. Make sure you provide acceptable scratching materials and positions for your cat. You can get wooden or sisal rope scratching posts, or cardboard scratching mats. Consider providing a selection of these all around the house, and make sure they’re strategically placed. Good places to put the scratchers include, but not limited to; near sleeping areas, near windows, nears exits and entrances of rooms, and any other place the cat favors. To train the cat to use the scratchers, you can reward him/her with praise and treats every time he/she happens to scratch appropriately. You can also consider placing toys and catnip near the scratchers to encourage the behavior.

Interactive Games
Think about playing with the cat as a way of maximizing his/her mental, physical and emotional well being. Cats can benefit from various types of games especially interactive games. Interactive games can involve you holding a fishing pole type of toy so that the cat can focus on being the hunter. You can move the fishing pole type of toy like a prey so that the cat can practice his/her natural hunting skills. Engaging your cat in appropriate interactive games is a great outlet for their natural behaviors. These interactive games can also help strengthen the bond between you and your cat, as you both get to have a good time playing with toys. That said, it’s important to note that cats tend to get bored with toys after sometime, so it’s important to provide just a couple of toys at a time, on rotating basis so as to keep the cat interested.

High Resting Places
Cats are natural climbers and generally like to be up high. Providing access to vertical or elevated places will make your cat happy as it increases the amount of space available to them. You can provide your cat with a carpeted cat tree with hiding spots. Alternatively, you can obtain ornamental cat shelves which can be easily mounted on the walls in appealing, decorative patterns which allow your cat to use multiple levels in your home, and move through the house through different pathways. You can also bring the outside world to your indoor cat by providing perches. Perches allow your cat to explore the outside (or the inside) world. Remember to keep rotating the location of the cat perches periodically.

Hiring A Pet Sitter

In our busy lives, we sometimes do not have consistent time for ourselves, never mind our pets.  Hiring a pet sitter to come in every day during the week can help your cat’s mentally and physically.  Consistent play time can help your cats sleep better and be healthier.

Professional Pet Sitting Etc can help.  We can come in every day while you are at work and get your kitty that much deserved and needed fun and playtime.

 

**********************************************************************************

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

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Scratching Ideas For Cats

Beautiful cat with scratching post isolated on white background

Scratching posts should be taller then your cat completely stretched out

Keeping Cat Nails Healthy 

  Author, Dorinne Whynott, Owner of Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

Cats love to scratch, and it’s important to understand that scratching is a normal and HEALTHY feline behavior. They love to scratch different types of surfaces, in a variety of positions. This seemingly simple activity provides numerous psychological and physical benefits to cats. Cats scratch to sharpen their claws, exercise their legs, mark their territory, and to reduce stress. Scratching also helps the cats get rid of the old claws/nails so that sharp new ones can grow. Unfortunately the scratching can cause all kinds of damage to your furniture, the curtains, carpet, and many other things in your home.

To avoid the damage, keep your cat’s nails trimmed.  This should be done about every 4-6 weeks, depending on your cats nail growth.

Then offer your cats many different types of scratching alternatives.

Cats must have a proper outlet for their scratching urge, therefore, providing a scratching post can save your furniture, carpet and curtains from destruction. A scratching post is basically a pole which stands at about 4 ft tall or more, but can also lay flat on the floor, or can be inclined. The main benefit of a scratching post is that it turns your cat’s attention away from your carpet and furniture. Choosing or making the best scratching post can be somewhat frustrating and you might need to experiment with different types of scratching posts to find one that the cat will scratch reliably.

Cat Scratching Post Materials
The type of material used to make a scratching post is very important. For you to get the cat interested in a scratching post than the carpet and furniture, the material of the scratching post should to be enticing, and also feel good beneath the cat’s nails. Here are some of the most popular scratching post materials;

Sisal

A cat scratching post covered with rough sisal rope is one of most popular options. Sisal material is heavy duty, feels absolutely great to cats, and it shreds under their nails in a very pleasing way. The sisal actually accomplishes the same purpose as the tree bark; it catches the cat’s front claws allowing the cat to pull downwards and release its’ sheath to expose the brand new claws underneath. Sisal posts are eco-friendly, more durable, and they usually last for many years before requiring a replacement.

Corrugated Cardboard

This is another great material used to make scratching posts. Just like the sisal material, it also has a very pleasing feeling and it makes appealing noises when scratched. Economical corrugated cardboard posts are quite easy to replace, and they appeal to most cats.

Carpeting and Upholstery

There are some scratching posts which are covered with carpeting and/or upholstery. However, experts advice against using this type of material, as the cat will not understand why it’s okay to scratch some carpeting and not the other.

Wood

This type of scratching post is basically a polished timber board which is made of hardwood. In their natural habitat, cats normally sharpen their claws/nails against trees, therefore many of them do prefer this type of scratching material. It’s important that the wood be of high quality, otherwise your cat may get injured by splinters.

Cat Scratching Post Size

Cats like tall, sturdy posts (4 feet or higher) which do not move around when they’re scratching and stretching. If your cat happens to feel unsteady or uncomfortable on the post, he/she will find a much more solid scratching surface. The scratching post should also be tall enough to allow the cat to fully stretch when scratching. This basically means that the cat should,be able to extend his/her body fully, and pull the shoulder and back muscles, which is really important for flexibility and health. If the posts is too short, the cat will have to hunch over in order to use it, and this doesn’t allow for a proper shoulder and back stretch, They will not get the full benefit of exercising, and it might even feel uncomfortable for them.

That said, it’s important to note that, the taller the scratching post, the sturdier it should be. Cats can get injured or even killed by a big, unstable post falling on them. Make sure the post has an extra heavy, and wide base, preferably double thick.

Type of construction
Vertical scratchers

These are bars, mats or plates which are attached onto a wall or standing on a pedestal. They are great for cats who sharpen their claws while standing on hind legs.

Inclined scratchers

These are especially attractive for most cats, as they allow them to sharpen their claws in various different positions.The inclined scratchers also help the cat’s stretch and work more muscles.

Floor scratchers

These are usually planks or mats placed on the floor. These cat scratchers are designed for cats who like sharpening their claws/nails in the horizontal position. That said, you should know that some cats do not like scratching on the vertical scratchers, but will willingly scratch on a floor scratcher.

How To Make a Cat Scratcher

What you’ll Need –
-A wooden board
-Sisal rope
-hot glue gun
-Eye hooks
-One yard twine
-Six yards colored twine

Instructions;

Step 1

Turn the wooden board onto its’ back, and hot glue the beginning of your sisal rope onto the middle of the wooden board where you’d like the scratching area to start.

Step 2

Flip the wooden board, and then line the sisal rope up against itself with every turn. After a couple of turns, hot glue the sisal rope on the board’s back so as to firmly secure your scratching pad.

Step 3

Continue turning the wooden board til you reach the bottom of the desired scratching section. Now, hot glue the back of the wooden board to properly secure the sisal rope, and cut the rope.

Step 4

Hot glue the beginning of the yarn to the top, back of your desired scratch area, and twist the wooden board to make a nice pattern with the yarn. Now, tie off the end of the yarn, and secure it with hot glue on the board’s back. Repeat this with a different colored yarn.

Step 5

Now trim any excess yarn, and securely twist the eye hooks into the top back of the wooden board.

Step 6

Thread the twine through the eye hooks so as to create an “over the door” type of feature.
Step 7

Hang your scratcher and let the games begin! Remember, you should make sure the scratcher is sturdily supported, because the cat will not use it if it is unsteady or wobbly.

Another Do It Yourself Scratcher is to use the poles in your basement.  

The poles are used to hold up the main support beams for the house.  I just used sisal rope wrapped around the entire pole.  Starting at the bottom with hot glue, then wrap around and around.  Hot glue each ending.  I used SIX 50 foot rolls to go from the bottom to the top.  My cats love climbing all the way to the top.

Have Fun !!

 

**********************************************************************************

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

Share

Vaccines For Cats

Veterinarian giving an injection to a cat

Milly gets her vaccine!

What Vaccines Do Cats Need,

How Often Should They Be Given,

and How Do Vaccines Work

 

The health of our pets can be a massive concern. We always want what is best for them so they can live long, healthy lives with us and we want this for as long as possible. For many of us, this means disease prevention through regular check-ups and vaccines for cats. There are many vaccinations for cats, all of which need to be administered at the right time.

How Vaccines Work To Protect Your Cat

When a cat is vaccinated, a very small amount of infectious agent, (agents are modified to not cause any harm to your cat), gets administered to your cat. The infectious agent in the vaccine formulation stimulates your cat’s immune system so it can generate protective immune response. The vaccine induced immune response, prepares the cat’s immune system for any future exposure to the natural disease causing agent. In case of any exposure in the future, the vaccination induces a generation of the memory cells in your pet’s immune system to immediately neutralize the condition. A properly immunized cat will eliminate the pathogenic disease agents before they can cause a serious disease.

Your kitten’s first vaccines.

At 8 weeks, your new kitten will receive their first Distemper combination vaccine. This generally includes three core vaccinations. Many vets prefer a modified live virus, rather than one with a killed virus, because they tend to work faster with greater efficiency.  Both types of vaccines, modified live and killed, are modifications of the disease to give all the benefits without the disease actually taking hold in our pets. Options and advice may vary between veterinarians.

Most vets will offer the following three cat vaccines usually in one combination vaccine called a Distemper or FVRCP on your pet’s health record:

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR): The vaccine for this disease is another, effective, low risk option. It does a great job at reducing the severity and duration of disease, but some cats may experience the side effect of sneezing. Some vets advocate the use of an intranasal vaccine for faster protection.

Feline Calicivirus/cat flu (C): Like FIE, this illness is common and can easily infect unvaccinated cats. Vaccines can be effective and low risk, with a high impact. However, there is the issue that the threat cannot be completely eradicated. Like human flu, there are many strains and it is difficult to fight them all.

Panleukopenia (P): There are many names for this illness, another being feline infectious enteritis, or FIE. It is caused by the panleukopenia virus and can turn into a fatal gut condition. Unvaccinated cats are seen as being at great risk from this virus because it is so widespread. The good news is that the FIE vaccine is effective and low risk.

The above are all air born diseases.  That means that they are spread through the air.  They can affect inside cats through windows, open doors, fans drawing air inside the home, etc.  Many people believe that their inside cats are not at risk but if there is an affected cat roaming around outside you home, that is simply not true.

The combination Distemper vaccines includes the core vaccinations that all kittens need and they will receive additional boosters during their vaccination schedule.

12 weeks sees the second Distemper combination and maybe a vaccination for Chlamydophila (Pneumonitis). Chlamydophila vaccinations are also provided in later life based upon the prevalence of the disease and lifestyle of the cat. It is spread via a bacteria in close physical contact, causing conjunctivitis. It therefore only really affects multi-cat households and kittens. Owners should also note here that kittens won’t be fully protected until around 10 days after this second vaccination.

16 weeks sees another Distemper combination, a booster for Chlamydophila and new vaccinations for Rabies and Feline Leukemia. FeLV vaccinations are recommended to all kittens because of their susceptibility and the chance they may become outdoor cats.

19 weeks is a booster for FeLV for kittens that continue to be at risk of exposure to this feline leukemia virus.

All vaccines are booster 1 year later. Then every 3 years for Distemper and Rabies.

What about adult cats?

The cat vaccine schedule for kittens is vital to ensure that young cats get everything they need to fight off key feline illnesses. The next concern for cat owners is what to do with adult cats. There are some cat owners and veterinarians that are keen to provide boosters for all illnesses every year, just to be on the safe side, especially if they are outdoor cats.

There are adult booster vaccinations for the Distemper combination, chlamydophila, FeLV and rabies shots. The types, intervals and times will depend on the advice of your vet. It must be noted that the AAFP recommends that FeLV vaccinations are not given to indoor adult cats with no exposure to other cats.

For adult cats with unknown vaccine history that will be indoor cats, they are usually given a Distemper and Rabies initially, then boostered in one year, then every 3 years after that.

Why bother with vaccines for cats in adult life, or even as kittens?

There are some cat owners that are against the idea of vaccinations and medical intervention for diseases that their pets are unlikely to contract. While it is true that many of the diseases prevented by these cat vaccines are rare these days, there is still a risk.

The rarity of illness is due to vigilant vaccinations.

A decline, and the mingling of unvaccinated animals, could increase this risk significantly. A vaccine is a small price to pay, and small inconvenience, for long-term protection against horrific, potentially fatal illness.

Don’t put your kittens and cats at risk. Keep up to date with your cat vaccine schedule.

The details of these vaccinations for cats can vary depending on age, locations and circumstances. However, it is important that you stick to whatever schedule is recommended by your vet. A clear plan of action will provide all the necessary vaccines for all the right diseases. It is so much better to be safe than sorry.

**********************************************************************************

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

Share

Why Does My Cat……

Cat talking

Hi, How Are You?
How does your cat get your attention?

.

.

Ever Wonder Why

.

Your Cat Does certain Things?

.

Let’s Find Out…

.

.

 Author, Darlene Wagner for Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

It’s estimated that 30 – 37% of households in the U.S. include at least one cat, with the total number of cats in the U.S. somewhere in the 74+ million range. Yep… that’s a lot of cats! And of that 74+ million, how many do we truly understand when it comes to why they do what they do? You got that right… not a one!

 

Obviously, cats are the preferred choice of pet for many of us, despite their mysterious ways, bewildering behaviors and oddball obsessions. If you share your life with a furr-ever feline friend, there are likely numerous things she does that have you scratching your head and asking “why?” Well, maybe you can find some answers here!

 

…Head Butt Me?

 

Believe it or not, this is actually a form of feline affection. By rubbing against you – or head “bunting” you – Fluffy is marking you with her scent, claiming you as her own. You see, cats have scent glands all over their body, with the most concentrated area being their heads, with glands under the chin, around the mouth, on the ears and at the temples. When she knocks heads with you, it’s because you are important to her and she wants everyone to know it!

 

…Meow at Me?

 

While Fluffy’s meowing likely isn’t constant, it can sometimes get to the point where it’s just plain annoying. Kittens learn to meow to let their mother know when they’re cold, hungry or scared. But as cats get older, their meowing is reserved specifically for communicating with their humans. And when Fluffy is meowing directly at you, she likely wants something, whether it be food, a treat, attention, or to say “hey, you, go clean my litter box!”

 

Chances are, when Fluffy meows at you, you respond. After time, it’s as if the two of you are actually having a conversation. Cats are smart and it doesn’t take them long to learn meowing yields results.

 

Now, if your cat meows non-stop, the only true way to end the madness is to remove the reinforcement she receives when she meows. This is much easier said than done, as most cats aren’t keen on change and their mild-mannered meows may turn into horrid howls. Sometimes, it’s purely a matter of choosing the lesser of two evils if you want to maintain your sanity!

 

Keep in mind, excessive meowing and other vocalization such as howling, growling and hissing can also indicate your kitty is feeling anxious, experiencing age-related changes, or is in pain. If this seems to be the case, seek advice from your veterinarian.

 

…Bite When Petted?

 

How many times have you been sitting comfortably on your couch, Fluffy in your lap purring with pleasure as you rub her when, suddenly and with no warning, you feel her razor sharp teeth sink into your hand? As we all know, cats are finicky, fickle creatures and these “love bites” tend to happen when Fluffy has decided “okay, I’ve had enough.” While this type of aggression isn’t fully understood by animal researchers, a common theory suggests most cats simply like being in control, and by nipping you when she’s had enough canoodling, Fluffy is taking control of the situation.

 

Cats definitely have their fair share of quirks, but it’s those quirks that make them the unique, entertaining, charismatic companions we know and love!

**********************************************************************************

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

Share

What is Feline Audiogenic Reflex Seizures

cat relaxing

Feline Seizures

.

Have You Ever

Heard of

.

Feline Audiogenic

Reflex Seizures?

.

 Author, Darlene Wagner for Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

Does the sound of someone chewing their food or tapping their fingernails make you cringe? Is there a common sound that doesn’t typically bother others, but can easily and quickly send you over the edge? If you have a kitty companion, you may not be alone.

 

Discovered in the United Kingdom

 

A bizarre seizure disorder affecting felines was discovered a few years ago in the United Kingdom. Common, everyday sounds seemed to trigger these epileptic-like seizures, accompanied with various symptoms such as loss of balance, convulsions, running in circles, restlessness and freezing in place. Noises that induced these seizures included things as simple as the clicking of a TV remote control, rustling of a newspaper and a variety of other normal household sounds.

 

Researchers began investigating this odd phenomenon and soon learned pet parents from around the world witnessed the same reactions to certain sounds in their own felines. The one factor almost all cases had in common was the affected cat’s veterinarian having no explanation for the condition, and the general disbelief that sound was the trigger.

 

FARS, a.k.a. the Tom and Jerry Syndrome

 

With these findings, the researchers became even more determined to study the anomaly and find answers. They collected data from 96 affected cats and concluded that some cats do indeed suffer from seizures caused by sounds. The disorder was named Feline Audiogenic Reflex Seizures (FARS), otherwise known as “Tom and Jerry Syndrome.”

 

Research found some sounds did indeed cause the afflicted cats in the study to experience non-convulsive seizures, brief jerks of a muscle or group of muscles, or full-body seizures that lasted up to several minutes. The sounds that most often trigged these seizures were:

 

·         Aluminum foil being crinkled

·         Tapping a metal spoon against a ceramic bowl

·         Clinking or tapping of glass

·         Crinkling of a plastic bag or paper

·         Typing on a keyboard

·         The clicking of computer mouse

·         Clinking of coins and keys

·         Hammering of nails

·         A person clicking their tongue

 

Among the 96 cats studied, all were affected by one or more of these sounds, but the Birman breed proved to be particularly vulnerable.  The cats in the study all ranged in age from 10 to 19 years, with the average age being 15, leading researchers to conclude a seizure disorder may be overlooked by veterinarians as older animals naturally tend to have other health issues that are more obvious and recognizable.

Thanks to the UK researchers, FARS is now a known and recognizable disorder and the kitties who suffer can be treated with sound aversion and anti-seizure medication.

If your kitty companion experiences any of the signs that go along with FARS, seek veterinary attention and mention your suspicion that your kitty may have the disorder.

 

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If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

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What is Feline Stomatitis

Cat crying

Ow, I don’t feel good!

.

Feline Stomatitis,

.

what is it and

.

what can you do

Author, Darlene Wagner for Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

We’ve all heard of gingivitis, that nasty swelling of our mouth’s tissues that can give us such oral distress as painful ulcers, bleeding and tenderness and can lead to periodontal disease if not treated. Well, did you know your cat can suffer the same fate if you don’t care for her teeth as you do your own? That’s right, cats can develop a disease known as feline stomatitis which, unfortunately, is quite common in adult cats.

 

It’s not known what the exact cause of feline stomatitis is, but it sometimes develops due to untreated tartar and plaque on the cat’s teeth. However, a great deal of feline experts believe the disease is the result of an over-active immune system which encourages the bacteria in the cat’s mouth to attack its own tissues. This immune system disorder can be contributed to feline conditions such as:

 

  • Nutritional imbalances
  • Food sensitivities or allergies
  • Chemical toxicity from exposure to environmental chemicals, plastics and preservatives
  • Chronic viral infections such as feline immunodeficiency virus, the herpes virus and bartonellosis (commonly known as cat scratch disease)
  • Stress

 

So, how do you know if your favorite feline might suffer from stomatitis?

 

Common signs that your feline may have the disease include bad breath (though not always a symptom) and pain in her mouth. Since your cat can’t tell you whether or not she’s in pain, look for indications that she’s experiencing a painful mouth, such as:

 

  • She often paws at her mouth
  • She drools excessively, and the drool may sometimes contain blood
  • Her appetite decreases, or she refuses to eat at all
  • She doesn’t groom herself as often as she once did
  • Her behavior has changed, for example, she’s being more clingy than usual, or she’s been hiding often

 

How do you know for sure that your cat has stomatitis?

 

If you notice any of the above signs, make an appointment with your cat’s veterinarian for a check-up. Be aware, kitty may need to be anesthetized in order to allow a thorough examination of her mouth and to prevent any undue pain during the exam.

 

While under anesthesia, the vet may opt to clean kitty’s teeth and, perhaps, get a gum tissue sample for lab review. And x-rays may be necessary to determine the extent of the disease. As well, specific blood tests may be done to check for the chronic viral infections mentioned above.

 

If it is determined your cat does indeed have stomatitis, what can be done?

 

Treatment of stomatitis varies depending on what caused the disease in the first place. With some cats, teeth extraction is necessary in order to remove the mouth surfaces that are often attacked by the bacteria that causes the disease. In others, antibiotics, steroids and/or pain medications may do the trick.

 

Also helpful during treatment and for the remainder of your cat’s life is the maintenance of good oral hygiene, including tooth-brushing, oral additives in your cat’s water dish, and treats that are made specifically for tooth-care.

 

You can also focus on providing your cat with a high protein, low carbohydrate diet with a protein source not previously encountered by your cat’s digestive system. As well, CoQ10 and zinc supplements have been shown to combat stomatitis.

 

So, as you can see, proper dental care is as crucial for your cat’s health as it is for your own. By paying attention to your cat’s behavior, maintaining a good oral health regime, and possibly changing your cat’s diet you can keep that pesky and painful stomatitis at bay!

 

 

**********************************************************************************

 

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

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This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

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Is Your Cat Leash Trained

cat outside

I LOVE being outside safe

.

Leash Training

Your Cat ~

Yes, It Can Be Done!

.

Author, Darlene Wagner for Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

How nice would it be to take a leisurely stroll with your cat walking by your side? And how much would your cat enjoy being able to take in all the sights and sounds he normally sees and hears only through his favorite window from the safety of his home? You and your cat can enjoy the niceties of an outdoor walk simply by training him to walk on a leash. Contrary to popular belief, yes, it CAN be done! Now, you know your cat better than anyone, so if you suspect your cat will scoff at the idea of wearing a harness and walking while attached to a leash, you’re probably right. But it can’t hurt to try!

 

First Things First

 

Purchase a well-fitting harness for your favorite feline. A collar is not advisable as cats are known for their flexibility and can easily slip out of a collar, especially a safety collar. With a harness, it will be easier to attach a leash and, when fitted properly, can be quite comfortable for your cat. Besides, a harness offers greater safety for your cat in the even he decides to run up a tree as it won’t choke him like a standard collar will. There are harnesses designed especially for cats with the ring to attach the leash located closer to the center of the harness rather than at the neck, which is safer and less stressful for your cat.

 

The Basic Steps to Leash Training Your Cat

 

  1. Don’t go out and buy a harness and leash, rush home and put it on your cat right away. Give him time to adjust to the contraption. Let him play with it for a while first so he can get accustom to it. Obviously, don’t let him play with it so much that it gets damaged, but enough to give him the chance to become unafraid of the harness so he’ll be more accepting when you go to put it on him.
  2. Place the harness loosely on your kitty and see how he reacts to it. If he is willing, tighten the harness appropriately, attach the leash and practice walking your cat around your house. This will help him become comfortable wearing the harness and acquaint him to the feeling of the leash.
  3. When you feel confident your cat is doing well and is comfortable walking in his harness and leash, take him outside for a walk. Let him set the pace, as it may be daunting for an otherwise indoor kitty to suddenly be outside. If he shies away from any step, simply go back and try again.
  4. Be patient! Don’t rush it! Your cat may experience a flood of emotions while learning to walk outdoors on a leash. For example, he may be frightened and freeze in place at first or, to the contrary, he may get overly excited, go hog wild and take off running. As the saying goes, all good things take time!

 

As anyone who is owned by a cat will know, they differ from dogs in that they do what they want, when they want, and how they want. But if you and your kitty can work together to perfect his leash walking skills, he will surely thank you for the outdoor experiences with extra special purrs, kitty kisses and eternal love!

 

**********************************************************************************

 

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

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This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

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Does Your Cat Drink Enough?

cat drinking

Cat generally do not drink enough

Help

Your Cat

Drink

More Water

.

 Author, Darlene Wagner for Professional Pet Sitting Etc.

Most pet parents don’t know exactly how much water their kitty should be drinking per day, let alone how much they’re actually getting. It is probably surprising to most to learn cats need anywhere between 2/3 cup and 1 1/3 cups of water per day in order to maintain optimal urinary health and overall well-being. Many cats are in a constant state of dehydration because they have a very low thirst drive and if you see a cat drinking alot, it may be due to kidney disease or some other ailment.

So what can you, as a devoted kitty caretaker, do to ensure your favorite feline is getting enough water? Here are a few simple tricks:

 

  1. Clean and Fresh is a Must.
    For goodness sake, make sure your kitty’s water bowls are clean and contain fresh water. A good rule of thumb is to change the water in your cat’s bowl each time you feed her. Also, swap out the bowl for a clean one every few days. Slimy, gross, stale water or bowls will definitely NOT entice your kitty to drink the amount of water she needs.

 

  1. Wet Food is a Plus.
    It is highly recommended you feed your cat a mostly canned food diet, as this is a super duper easy way to get more moisture in your cat’s life. Most canned varieties of cat food contain 70 – 80% water, making it an ideal source of H2O for Fluffy. If your cat isn’t crazy about canned food (which typically isn’t the case!), try adding some water to her dry food.

 

  1. Ice, Ice Baby.
    Ice cold water is yummy for most cats…and fun, too! Shake things up by tossing a cube of ice in your cat’s water bowl. You may even try adding a cube to kitty’s food. It’s fun for her to lick and provides her with a little extra moisture in the process.

 

  1. Provide Plenty of Water Sources.
    Consider this…would you like to trek all the way downstairs to the kitchen each and every time you wanted a drink of water? Make it easy on kitty! Place water bowls or cups of water throughout the house so she can get some water whenever, and wherever, she’s thirsty. Always keep the auxiliary watering holes fresh and clean, and located in spots that are commonly visited by kitty.

 

  1. Running Water is a Special Treat.
    You know, sometimes things can get boring for a cat. One way to spice up your kitty’s life is with running water! If your cat likes to drink out of the faucet, let her! Turn that sucker on a few times a day and let your kitty have a little fun. Not keen on the idea of leaving water running? Make a small investment in a cat water fountain. They are super fun, capture kitty’s interest, and keep kitty’s water fresh. Best of all, you can buy one for less than $25.

 

So, if you were a cat, what would entice you to drink more water? Whatever ideas come to mind, apply them to your kitty’s world! Do whatever you think will keep kitty in the 2/3 – 1 1/3 cups per day range.

To  learn more on why cats have a low thirst drive and how to properly feed for hydration, please read – Feeding Cats By Gus Bennett

**********************************************************************************

 

 

If you liked this article, check out our other articles – Complete List Of Our Article and Videos

About the Owner and Professional Pet Sitting Etc

Dorinne Whynott, is a long time animal professional.  She is a successful business owner establishing one of the largest pet sitting companies in New Hampshire since 1990. Click to Read her complete History. 

Professional Pet Sitting Etc. is a leading business in the pet care field and continues to grow since 1990. It is an AWARD WINNING business, having been awarded the 2015 Best Pet Sitting , 2015 Best Dog Walker, Business of the Year Awards in 1996, 1997, 2006 and 2010.  It boasts 30+ amazing pet sitters on staff, over 3000 clients in 38 cities from Nashua to Concord, NH.  Hundreds of satisfied client testimonials can be found on their website and more 5 star reviews on their Facebook pageGoogle+ page and more.  They have sustained an A+ rating with the BBB, A rating with Angie’s List and are unmatched in the Pet Sitting Industry in New Hampshire.

Click Here for Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews, Testimonial and Awards

Click For a Complete List of all of our educational Blogs

Go to Professional Pet Sitting Etc. Website for more information on the best pet sitting company or click on New Client to contact us or register for dog walking or pet care.

Contact us by phone at 603-888-8088

Email Profpetsit@aol.com

Pet Sitting NH , Pet Sitting Nashua NH , Pet Care NH, Petsitternh, Petsittersnh, Professional pet sitter, pet sitters, professional pet sitting, pet sitting, pet sitter, professional pet services, professional pet sitters, pro pet sitting, pet sit, pet, puppy sitting

cat sitting, cat sitter, cat sitters, professional cat sitter

dog, dog sitting,  professional dog sitter, Dog walking new hampshire, dog sitter, Dog Walking NH, dog walking services, Dog Walker, Dog Walker NH

Professional Pet Sitting Etc Reviews and Testimonials

All rights reserved, copyright 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

This article can not be copied in part or in whole without specific written permission by the Author and Owner.

Share